urbn-def14a_20220607.htm

 

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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION

Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

(Amendment No.    )

 

Filed by the Registrant                               Filed by a party other than the Registrant  

Check the appropriate box:

 

Preliminary Proxy Statement

 

 

Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))

 

 

Definitive Proxy Statement

 

 

Definitive Additional Materials

 

 

Soliciting Material Under § 240.14a-12

URBAN OUTFITTERS, INC.

(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)

 

(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)

Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):

 

 

No fee required.

 

 

Fee paid previously with preliminary materials.

 

 

Fee computed on table in exhibit required by Item 25(b) per Exchange Act Rules 14a-16(i)(1) and 0-11.

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

Dear Shareholder:

 

You are cordially invited to attend the 2022 Annual Meeting of Shareholders of Urban Outfitters, Inc. to be held at 10:30 a.m., on Tuesday, June 7, 2022 (the “Annual Meeting”).  In light of the successful use of virtual meetings in 2020 and 2021, we will again conduct our Annual Meeting in a virtual format, via live audio webcast.  We believe that a virtual meeting will provide meaningful shareholder access and participation and also protect the health and safety of our shareholders, employees and other stakeholders.  During the virtual meeting, you may ask questions and will be able to vote your shares electronically.  Shareholders can access the Annual Meeting by visiting https://web.lumiagm.com/270154195 (password: urban2022).

The matters to be considered and voted upon are described in the 2022 Notice of Annual Meeting of Shareholders and the Proxy Statement that accompany this letter. It is important that your shares be represented and voted at the Annual Meeting. Kindly read the attached Proxy Statement and vote your shares at the meeting, over the Internet, by telephone or, if you received one, by signing and dating the paper copy of the proxy card and returning it promptly.

I look forward to your virtual participation at the Annual Meeting where we will review the business and operations of Urban Outfitters, Inc.

 

Sincerely,

 

Richard A. Hayne

Chairman of the Board

DATE: April 1, 2022

 

 


 

 

URBAN OUTFITTERS, INC.

5000 South Broad Street

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19112-1495

 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS

June 7, 2022

 

TO OUR SHAREHOLDERS:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Annual Meeting of Shareholders of Urban Outfitters, Inc. (the “Company”) will be conducted as follows:

Date:June 7, 2022

Time:10:30 a.m.

 

Means:

Virtual meeting only, via live audio webcast at https://web.lumiagm.com/270154195 (password: urban2022). During the virtual meeting, you may ask questions and will be able to vote your shares electronically. To participate in the Annual Meeting, you will need the 16-digit control number included on your Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials or on your proxy card or obtained in the manner prescribed by your nominee.  

We encourage you to access the meeting prior to the start time to allow time for check in. Please note that there is no in-person annual meeting for you to attend.

 

Purpose:

1.  To elect ten directors to serve a term expiring at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders in 2023.

 

2.  To ratify the appointment of Deloitte & Touche LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting

     firm for Fiscal Year 2023.

 

3.  To approve the Amended and Restated Urban Outfitters 2017 Stock Incentive Plan.

4.  To hold an advisory vote to approve executive compensation.

 

5.  To consider and vote on a shareholder proposal, as described in the accompanying proxy statement, if properly

     presented at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders (the “Shareholder Proposal”).

 

6.  To transact such other business as may properly come before the Annual Meeting of Shareholders.

The Board of Directors of the Company unanimously recommends that you vote “FOR” the election of each of the nominees for director listed in Proposal 1, “FOR” Proposals 2, 3 and 4 and “AGAINST” Proposal 5, if it is properly presented at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders.

The Board of Directors of the Company has fixed April 1, 2022, as the record date for determining which shareholders are entitled to notice of, and to vote at, the Annual Meeting of Shareholders or any adjournment or postponement thereof.

 

 

By Order of the Board of Directors,

 

Azeez Hayne

Secretary

DATE: April 1, 2022

 

 


 

 

URBAN OUTFITTERS, INC.

5000 South Broad Street

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19112-1495

 

PROXY STATEMENT

ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS

 

The Board of Directors of Urban Outfitters, Inc. (the “Company”) is furnishing this proxy statement to solicit proxies from the Company’s shareholders for use at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders (the “Annual Meeting”), to be held on Tuesday, June 7, 2022, at 10:30 a.m., and any adjournments or postponements thereof. In light of the successful use of virtual meetings in 2020 and 2021, we will conduct our Annual Meeting in a virtual format, via live audio webcast at https://web.lumiagm.com/270154195. The Company believes that a virtual meeting will provide meaningful shareholder access and participation and also protect the health and safety of our shareholders, employees and other stakeholders. During the virtual meeting, shareholders may ask questions and will be able to vote their shares electronically.

The Company is making its proxy statement (this “Proxy Statement”) and its annual report to shareholders available electronically via the Internet. On or before April 28, 2022, we will mail to our shareholders a Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials (the “Notice”) containing instructions on how to access this Proxy Statement and our annual report and how to vote. Shareholders who receive the Notice will not receive a printed copy of the proxy materials in the mail, although a proxy card will be mailed separately to each shareholder that beneficially owns more than 1,000 of the Company’s common shares, par value $.0001 per share (the “Common Shares”). If you would like to receive a printed copy of our proxy materials, please follow the instructions included in the Notice.

Only shareholders of record, as shown on the transfer books of the Company at the close of business on April 1, 2022 (the “Record Date”), are entitled to notice of, and to vote at, the Annual Meeting. On March 11, 2022, there were 95,661,980 Common Shares outstanding. Shareholders of record on the Record Date may vote (i) by Internet by visiting the website specified in the Notice and on the proxy card, (ii) by telephone using the instructions provided in the Notice and on the proxy card, (iii) electronically at the Annual Meeting or (iv) by marking, executing and returning the proxy card, in accordance with the instructions thereon. Shareholders who hold their Common Shares in “street name” through a bank, broker or other holder of record (a “nominee”) must vote their Common Shares in the manner prescribed by their nominee.

Presence at the Annual Meeting, via webcast or by proxy, of the holders of a majority of the Common Shares entitled to vote is necessary to constitute a quorum, which is required for the Company to conduct business at the Annual Meeting. Each Common Share entitles the holder to one vote on each matter presented at the Annual Meeting. When voting is properly authorized over the Internet, by telephone or electronically at the Annual Meeting or proxy cards are properly dated, executed and returned, the Common Shares will be voted in accordance with the instructions of the shareholder.

Any shareholder giving a proxy has the power to revoke it prior to its exercise either by giving written notice to the Secretary of the Company, by voting electronically at the Annual Meeting, by executing a subsequent proxy card or by submitting a subsequent proxy over the Internet or by telephone. Shareholders who hold their Common Shares in “street name” must obtain a legal proxy from their nominee in order to vote at the Annual Meeting and must otherwise follow instructions provided by their nominee with respect to revocation of voting instructions. After obtaining a legal proxy from their nominee, shareholders who hold their Common Shares in “street name” may register to attend the Annual Meeting by submitting proof of their legal proxy reflecting the number of their shares along with their name and email address to American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC (“AST”). Requests for registration should be directed to proxy@astfinancial.com or to facsimile number 718-765-8730.  Written requests can be mailed to:

 

American Stock Transfer & Trust Company LLC

Attn:  Proxy Tabulation Department

6201 15th Avenue

Brooklyn, NY 11219

Requests for registration must be labeled as “Legal Proxy” and be received no later than 5:00 p.m., Eastern Time, on May 20, 2022.  Shareholders who hold their Common Shares in “street name” and register to attend the Annual Meeting will receive confirmation of registration by email after AST receives their registration materials.

The following table summarizes the vote threshold required for approval of each proposal and the effect on the outcome of the vote of abstentions and uninstructed shares held by nominees. When a shareholder who holds his or her Common Shares in “street name” does not provide voting instructions to his or her nominee, the nominee may not vote those shares on matters deemed non-routine (referred to as broker non-votes). Proposals 1, 3, 4 and 5 below are non-routine matters.

Signed but unmarked proxy cards will be voted “FOR” the election of each of the nominees for director listed in Proposal 1, “FOR” Proposals 2 through 4, “AGAINST” Proposal 5 and in accordance with the judgment of the persons voting the proxies with respect to such other matters as may come before the Annual Meeting and any adjournments or postponements thereof.

4


 

 

Proposal
Number

 

Item

 

Votes Required for Approval

 

Effect of
Abstentions

 

Uninstructed
Shares/Effect of
Broker Non-votes

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Election of directors

Affirmative vote of a majority of the votes cast (a “Majority Vote”) with respect to each nominee

No effect

Not voted/No effect

 

 

 

 

 

2

Ratification of the appointment of Deloitte & Touche LLP as the Company’s independent public accounting firm for Fiscal Year 2023

Majority Vote

No effect

Discretionary vote by nominee

 

 

 

 

 

3

Approval of the Amended and Restated Urban Outfitters 2017 Stock Incentive Plan

Majority Vote

No effect

Not voted/No effect

 

 

 

 

 

4

Advisory, non-binding vote to approve executive compensation

Majority Vote

No effect

Not voted/No effect

 

 

 

 

 

5

Shareholder Proposal

Majority Vote

No effect

Not voted/No effect

 

 


5


 

 

PROPOSAL 1.    ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

The Company’s Amended and Restated By-laws (the “By-laws”) provide for the Board of Directors to be composed of as many directors as are designated from time to time by the Board of Directors. Currently, there are eleven directors, nine of whom are standing for re-election. In addition, a tenth director is nominated for election for the first time. Each director elected shall serve for a term of one year and until a successor is elected and qualified.

Unless otherwise directed, the persons named on the proxy intend to vote all valid proxies received by them “FOR” the election of the listed nominees. In the event any of the nominees shall be unable or unwilling to serve as a director, the persons named on the proxy intend to vote “FOR” the election of any person as may be nominated by the Board of Directors in substitution. The Company has no reason to believe that any of the nominees named below will be unable or unwilling to serve as a director if elected.

A nominee for election as a director must receive a majority of the votes cast to be elected. A majority of the votes cast means that the number of the votes cast “for” a nominee must exceed the number of votes cast “against” that nominee. Each shareholder is entitled to only one vote per share in the election of directors and each director nominee is voted upon separately. If an incumbent director who is a candidate for re-election is not elected, the director will be deemed to have tendered his or her resignation to the Board of Directors. The Nominating and Governance Committee of the Board of Directors (the “Nominating Committee”) will make a recommendation to the Board of Directors on whether to accept or reject the resignation, or whether other action should be taken, and the Board of Directors will be required to act on the Nominating Committee’s recommendation and disclose its decision and the rationale for the decision.

The nominees for re-election to the Board of Directors are Edward N. Antoian, Kelly Campbell, Harry S. Cherken, Jr., Margaret A. Hayne, Richard A. Hayne, Amin N. Maredia, Wesley S. McDonald, Todd R. Morgenfeld and John C. Mulliken. The nominee for election to the Board of Directors for the first time is Mary C. Egan.  Sukhinder Singh Cassidy and Elizbeth Ann Lambert are not standing for re-election, and the Company thanks them for their service and many contributions to the Company.  The Board of Directors has determined that eight of the nominees, Messrs. Edward N. Antoian, Harry S. Cherken, Jr., Amin N. Maredia, Wesley S. McDonald, Todd R. Morgenfeld, John C. Mulliken, Ms. Kelly Campbell and Mary C. Egan, as well as Ms. Elizabeth Ann Lambert and Ms. Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, who are not standing for re-election, were independent under the listing standards of the NASDAQ Global Select Market (“NASDAQ”). The Board of Directors believes that all of its directors possess personal and professional integrity, good judgment, a high level of ability and business acumen, and have performed exceptionally well in their respective time served as directors.

 

EDWARD N. ANTOIAN

Director Since 2011

Mr. Antoian, 66, is a partner of and Founder of Zeke Capital Advisors, a financial advisory firm. From 1997 until March 2019, Mr. Antoian was a partner and Senior Portfolio Manager at Chartwell Investment Partners.  Prior to that, Mr. Antoian worked at Delaware Management Co. as a Senior Portfolio Manager and at E.F. Hutton in Institutional Sales and as a certified public accountant for Price Waterhouse. Mr. Antoian holds an MBA in Finance and has financial and investment experience as a result of his experience as a CFA, CPA, financial advisor and portfolio manager. Mr. Antoian serves as a director of a not-for-profit entity and two private companies. As an independent director, Mr. Antoian brings his in-depth understanding of, and expertise in, finance and accounting to the Board of Directors.

 

KELLY CAMPBELL

Director Since 2021

Ms. Campbell, 44, has served as President of Peacock, NBCUniversal’s streaming service, since November 1, 2021.  Prior to joining Peacock, Ms. Campbell served as President of Hulu from February 2020 to October 2021 and as Chief Marketing Officer of Hulu from August 2017 to February 2020. From 2005 to 2017, Ms. Campbell held a variety of roles at Google across the Google Ads and Google Cloud businesses.  Ms. Campbell brings a wealth of knowledge and experience about marketing and subscription businesses to the Board of Directors.  Ms. Campbell was initially identified by Diversified Search, an outside search firm.

  

 

HARRY S. CHERKEN, JR.

Director Since 1989

Mr. Cherken, 72, is Senior Counsel at the law firm of Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He was previously a partner of that firm from November 1984 to January 2020, is a former managing partner of that firm and also served as either Chair or Co-Chair of its Real Estate Group for 18 years. As a real estate lawyer for over 45 years representing public and private companies in the acquisition, construction, development, financing, leasing, management, consolidation and disposition of commercial real estate, he has extensive experience with various types of real estate transactions and retail leases, including negotiating real estate transactions and leases on behalf of the Company nearly from its inception. He also holds a Masters in Liberal Arts degree and serves as a trustee of various not-for-profit entities and academic institutions. In 2021, Mr. Cherken was appointed Honorary Consul for Philadelphia of the Republic of Armenia.

6


 

  

MARY C. EGAN

Nominee for Director

 

Ms. Egan, 54, has been serving as an independent strategy consultant to high growth private equity and venture-capital backed consumer companies since 2018, currently as principal of Egan Advisory Group. In 2013, Ms. Egan founded Gatheredtable, a consumer software as a service company offering customized meal planning, and served as its Chief Executive Officer until Gatheredtable was sold to a strategic buyer in 2018. From 2010 to 2012, Ms. Egan served as head of global strategy and corporate development for Starbucks Corporation and in 2012 led Starbucks’ food category in the Americas.  From 1996 to 2010, Ms. Egan was a management consultant and Managing Director at The Boston Consulting Group, where she partnered with several leading consumer and retail brands to develop and successfully implement aggressive growth strategies. Ms. Egan also serves on the board of directors of American Campus Communities, Inc. (NYSE: ACC) and Noodles & Company (NASDAQ: NDLS). Ms. Egan’s decades of experience partnering with management teams to develop and implement consumer-centric strategies for high growth omnichannel consumer brands, as well as working extensively with founders and entrepreneurs, gives her a unique set of skills to contribute to the Board of Directors. Ms. Egan was initially identified by Diversified Search, an outside search firm.

 

MARGARET A. HAYNE

Director Since 2013

Ms. Hayne, 63, joined the Company in August 1982. She is an over 35-year veteran of the retail and wholesale industry.  She has served as Co-President of the Company since October 2020 and as Chief Creative Officer of Urban Outfitters, Inc. since November 2013. Ms. Hayne previously served as Chief Executive Officer of Free People from August 2015 until October 2020 and President of Free People from March 2007 until August 2016. Richard A. Hayne, the Company’s current Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, is Ms. Hayne’s spouse. Azeez Hayne, Chief Administrative Officer and General Counsel of the Company, is Ms. Hayne’s nephew. As an employee of the Company for over 35 years and a director since 2013, Ms. Hayne brings a wealth of both Company-specific and industry-wide knowledge and experience to the Board of Directors.

 

RICHARD A. HAYNE

Director Since 1976

Mr. Hayne, 74, co-founded Urban Outfitters in 1970. He has been Chairman of the Board of Directors since the Company’s incorporation in 1976 and, until February 2016, also served as the Company’s President. Mr. Hayne served as the Company’s principal executive officer until 2007 and again beginning in January 2012. Margaret A. Hayne, Co-President and Chief Creative Officer of Urban Outfitters, Inc., is Mr. Hayne’s spouse. Azeez Hayne, Chief Administrative Officer and General Counsel of the Company, is Mr. Hayne’s nephew. Mr. Hayne’s long tenure leading the Company as Chairman of the Board of Directors, his tenure as principal executive officer and his exceptional leadership skills make him uniquely qualified to serve as a director.

 

 AMIN N. MAREDIA

Director Since 2020

 

Mr. Maredia, 49, is a Co-founder of, and Managing Partner at Meaningful Partners, a consumer-focused fund that invests in purpose, mission and consumer relevant businesses in the consumer sector. Prior to co-founding Meaningful Partners in 2018, Mr. Maredia served as the Chief Executive Officer of Sprouts Farmers Market, Inc (“Sprouts”), the second largest healthy grocer in the United States, beginning in 2015 and also served on the board of directors of Sprouts. Mr. Maredia also served as Chief Financial Officer of Sprouts from 2011 to 2015. Before Sprouts, Mr. Maredia served in key global strategic roles at Burger King Corporation including leading strategy, global business development and finance.  Mr. Maredia has also been deeply involved in local and global community work for over two decades around health, education and economic development with various domestic and global organizations including the Aga Khan Development Network, the Sprouts Healthy Communities Foundation, Teach for America and Pratham USA. Mr. Maredia attended the Harvard Business School management program and has an undergraduate degree in Accounting from the University of Houston. Mr. Maredia’s in-depth experience in the consumer sector, including high growth omni-channel businesses, as well as his public company experience as Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and board member brings valuable expertise to serve as a director.

 

WESLEY S. MCDONALD

Director Since 2019

Mr. McDonald, 59, has been retired since 2017.  Previously, he held the principal officer position of Chief Financial Officer of Kohl’s Corporation from 2015 to 2017, and prior thereto, he served as Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Kohl’s beginning in 2010. Mr. McDonald began his tenure at Kohl’s in 2003 as its Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Before joining Kohl’s, Mr. McDonald served as Chief Financial Officer and Vice President of Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Earlier in his career, he held several positions of increasing responsibility at Target Corporation. Mr. McDonald currently serves on the Board of Directors of Wingstop Inc., which operates and franchises over 1,500 restaurants worldwide. Mr. McDonald’s experience as a chief financial officer and in other senior executive leadership roles working with publicly traded consumer products companies provides him with a distinctive set of qualifications and skills to serve as a director.

7


 

 

TODD R. MORGENFELD

Director Since 2019

Mr. Morgenfeld, 50, is the Chief Financial Officer and Head of Business Operations of Pinterest, Inc., a position he has held since 2019. From 2016 to 2019, he served as Chief Financial Officer of Pinterest, Inc. Before joining Pinterest, Mr. Morgenfeld served as Vice President of Finance at Twitter from 2015 to 2016 and Treasurer and Senior Vice President of Corporate Development and Corporate Financial Analytics for Hewlett-Packard Company from 2013 to 2015. Prior to his role at Hewlett-Packard, Mr. Morgenfeld was an investment partner at Silver Lake Partners from 2004 to 2013. Mr. Morgenfeld graduated first in his class from the United States Military Academy and also holds an MBA degree from Stanford University. Mr. Morgenfeld has served as a director of a not-for-profit entity and as chairman of the board and member of the audit committee of a public company. His significant finance and consumer internet experience provides valuable expertise to the Board of Directors.

 

JOHN C. MULLIKEN

Director Since 2020

Mr. Mulliken, 49, currently serves as a Senior Advisor with The Boston Consulting Group (“BCG”), a global management consulting firm where Mr. Mulliken previously served as a management consultant on topics of retail, consumer goods and technology, and a frequent advisor to high growth technology companies. Prior to re-joining BCG in 2020, Mr. Mulliken served on the executive team at Wayfair Inc. for a decade, serving as Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President of Strategic Initiatives. Mr. Mulliken founded and led several lifestyle brands including Joss & Main and Birch Lane.  He also led the acquisition and integration of DwellStudio as well as the ground-up creation of a proprietary ad tech business and tech stack.  Mr. Mulliken previously served as the Chief Integrated Product Officer at IndigoAg, an agricultural technology company.  Mr. Mulliken also serves on the board at Bombas, a direct-to-consumer apparel company. Mr. Mulliken has a 25-year track record of leading innovation and growth as a technology executive and management consultant.  Mr. Mulliken earned his undergraduate degree in Mathematics from Reed College and his MBA in Corporate Finance from London Business School. Mr. Mulliken’s decades of experience in ecommerce and multichannel retail as Chief Technology Officer and member of the executive team of a publicly traded company, as well as a strategy consultant and independent director, provides him valuable perspective as a director.

 

 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS A VOTE “FOR”

THE ELECTION OF EACH OF THE NOMINEES FOR DIRECTOR.

 

8


 

 

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AT URBAN OUTFITTERS

Governance Summary & Highlights

We are committed to corporate governance practices that promote long-term value creation, transparency and accountability to our shareholders. The Company and the Board of Directors engage with shareholders in an effort to ensure that management and the Board are focused on, and responsive to, investor priorities and concerns.

After extensive shareholder engagement efforts and evaluation of best practices over the past several years, the Board of Directors has adopted numerous governance changes, including:

 

declassifying the Board of Directors,

 

adopting a majority voting standard for director candidates,

 

appointing a lead independent director,

 

adopting a proxy access bylaw, and

 

holding annual say-on-pay votes.

In addition, the Company has substantially increased the number of independent Directors on the Board of Directors and significantly diversified the Board of Directors on multiple dimensions. In recent years, the Board of Directors has added multi-channel retail, financial, technology and consumer-sector expertise to the Board of Directors. If all director nominees are elected at the Annual Meeting, female Directors will make up 30% of the Board of Directors. For the fifth consecutive year, female Directors make up more than 25% of the Board of Directors. The Company will continue to seek new skills sets for the Board of Directors and to enhance overall diversity in board recruitment efforts going forward.


9


 

 

The matrix below provides summary information regarding the candidates for and current Board of Directors in an easy-to-read format.

Board of Directors

 

Edward N. Antoian

Kelly Campbell

Sukhinder Singh Cassidy

Harry S. Cherken, Jr.

Mary C. Egan

Margaret A. Hayne

Richard A. Hayne

Elizabeth Ann Lambert

Amin N. Maredia

Wesley S. McDonald

Todd R. Morgenfeld

John C. Mulliken

Standing for Re-Election

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

 

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Chairman of the Board

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Lead Independent Director

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Committee Memberships

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audit

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chair

X

 

Compensation and Leadership Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

Chair

 

Nominating and Governance

 

 

Chair

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

Demographic & Background

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Independent Director (NASDAQ Criteria)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Tenure (years)

11

-

5

33

-

9

46

8

1

3

3

1

Age

66

43

52

72

54

63

74

58

49

59

50

49

Gender

Male

Female

Female

Male

Female

Female

Male

Female

Male

Male

Male

Male

 

 

Board Diversity Matrix (As of April 1, 2022)

Total Number of Directors

11

 

Female

Male

Non-Binary

Did Not Disclose Gender

Part I: Gender Identity

Directors

3

7

 

1

Part II: Demographic Background

African American or Black

 

 

 

 

Alaskan Native or Native American

 

 

 

 

Asian (other than South Asian)

 

 

 

 

Indian/South Asian

1

1

 

 

Hispanic or Latinx

 

 

 

 

Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

 

 

 

 

White

2

5

 

 

Middle Eastern/North African

 

1

 

 

Two or More Races or Ethnicities

 

LGBTQ+

 

Did Not Disclose Demographic Background

1

Directors who have Military Experience

1

 

 

 

10


 

 

 Board of Directors

Our business is managed under the direction of our Board of Directors in accordance with the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law of 1988 and our By-laws. Members of the Board of Directors are kept informed of our business through discussions with the Chairman of the Board of Directors (the “Chairman”), the Chief Financial Officer and other officers, by reviewing materials provided to them and by participating in regular and special meetings of the Board of Directors and its committees. In addition, to promote open discussion among our non-employee directors, those directors meet in regularly scheduled executive sessions without the participation of management or employee directors.

The foundation for our corporate governance is the Board of Directors’ policy that a majority of the members of the Board of Directors should be independent. We have reviewed internally and with our Board of Directors the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the related rules of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and current NASDAQ Marketplace Rules regarding corporate governance policies and procedures. Our corporate governance documents comply with all applicable requirements.

In accordance with our By-laws, our Board of Directors has specified that the number of directors will be reduced from eleven to ten, effective as of the date of the Annual Meeting.  Currently, there are eleven directors, nine of whom are non-employee directors. The Board of Directors has determined that none of the nine current non-employee directors have any relationship that, in the opinion of the Board of Directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director, and that each meets the objective requirement of “independence” under the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules. Therefore, the Board of Directors has determined that each of these nine directors is an “independent” director under the standards currently set forth in the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules. Neither Richard A. Hayne nor Margaret A. Hayne is independent. See also “—Audit Committee” below.

The Board of Directors currently combines the role of Chairman and the role of Chief Executive Officer. Richard A. Hayne currently serves in both of these positions. The Board of Directors believes this is the most efficient and effective leadership structure for the Company at this time. Mr. Hayne is the co-founder of the Company and has been its Chairman since the Company’s incorporation in 1976, and as such, the Board of Directors believes that he is uniquely qualified through his experience and expertise to set the agenda for, and lead discussions of, strategic issues for the Company at the board level. Mr. Hayne has been instrumental in the Company’s historical success and is in large part responsible for the Company’s substantial growth since its inception.

The Board of Directors believes that the Company’s corporate governance structure provides the appropriate balance between the need for consistent strategic direction and the need for objectivity and independence of the non-management directors and includes several effective oversight mechanisms.  The Company’s corporate governance structure includes, but is not limited to, the following components:  (i) the Board of Directors is comprised of a majority of independent directors; (ii) following most meetings of the Board of Directors, the independent directors meet in executive session without the Chairman present to review, among other things, his performance as Chief Executive Officer; and (iii) various committees of the Board of Directors composed of only independent directors perform oversight functions independent of management, such as overseeing the integrity of the Company’s financial statements, senior executive compensation (including the compensation of the Chief Executive Officer) and the selection and evaluation of directors. Accordingly, the Board of Directors believes that requiring that the Chairman be a non-management director would weaken the Company’s leadership structure without providing any added benefit beyond that already achieved by its existing governance structure. The Board of Directors retains authority to modify this structure as it deems appropriate.  

In order to enhance the Board of Directors’ active and objective oversight of our management, the Board of Directors annually elects one of its independent directors to serve in a lead capacity (the “Lead Director”). Edward N. Antoian has been elected by the Board of Directors to serve as the Lead Director since 2018. The duties of the Lead Director are to (i) preside at all meetings of the Board of Directors at which the Chairman is not present, including any executive sessions of the independent directors, (ii) call meetings of the independent directors, (iii) serve as the principal liaison between the Chairman and the independent directors, (iv) approve the frequency of meetings of the Board of Directors and meeting agendas and schedules, (v) be available, when appropriate and when the Chairman is not available, for consultation and direct communication with shareholders of the Company, and (vi) review the Lead Director Charter on an annual basis and recommend to the Board of Directors for approval any modifications or changes. A copy of the charter for the Lead Director is available on the Company’s corporate website, www.urbn.com.

During Fiscal 2022, the Board of Directors held four meetings. Each member of the Board of Directors attended at least 75% of the total number of meetings of the Board of Directors and all committees on which he or she sits, except Ms. Campbell, who was not elected to the Board of Directors until December 2021.  All references in this Proxy Statement to our fiscal years refer to the fiscal years ended on January 31 in those years. For example, “Fiscal 2022” refers to the Company’s fiscal year ended January 31, 2022.

Committees of the Board of Directors

Our Board of Directors has an Audit Committee, a Compensation and Leadership Development Committee (“Compensation Committee”) and a Nominating and Governance Committee. The charters of these committees have been approved by our Board of Directors and are available on the Company’s corporate website at www.urbn.com.

 

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Audit Committee

The Audit Committee operates under a written charter that has been approved by the Board of Directors. The charter is reviewed annually by the Audit Committee with any recommended changes approved by the Board of Directors. The Audit Committee’s primary responsibility is to assist the Board of Directors in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities to our shareholders and other constituencies. In furtherance of those oversight responsibilities, the Audit Committee’s primary duties are to: (1) appoint (and terminate), compensate and oversee the work of the independent accountants, including the audit plan, scope and procedures; (2) pre-approve, in accordance with its pre-approval policies, all audit services and permissible non-audit services provided by the independent accountants to the Company; (3) confirm and assure the independence of the independent accountants by reviewing and discussing the formal written statement and other periodic written reports received from the independent accountants regarding their objectivity and independence, including statements concerning other relationships and services that may affect their independence; (4) set clear hiring policies for employees and former employees of the independent accountants; (5) consider and review with management, the independent accountants and management of the Company’s internal audit department the adequacy and effectiveness of the Company’s internal controls, including processes for identifying significant risks or exposures (as further discussed in “—Risk Management” below) and elicit recommendations for the improvement of such internal control procedures where desirable; (6) review with the independent accountants and management (i) the Company’s financial reporting (including financial statements and related footnotes), (ii) any significant changes required in the independent accountants’ audit plan, (iii) any material difficulties or disputes with management encountered during the course of the audit, (iv) other matters related to the conduct of the audit, (v) any material written communications provided by the independent accountants to management and the Company’s response to those communications and (vi) any legal and regulatory matters that may have a material impact on the financial statements; (7) review the appointment, replacement, reassignment or dismissal of management of the Company’s internal audit function; (8) review and approve all related-party transactions; (9) establish procedures for (i) the receipt, retention and treatment of complaints received by the Company regarding accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters and (ii) the confidential, anonymous submission by employees of the Company of concerns regarding these issues; (10) report committee actions to the Board of Directors with such recommendations as the Audit Committee may deem appropriate; (11) prepare the audit committee report required to be filed with the SEC; (12) investigate any matter brought to its attention within the scope of the Audit Committee’s duties, with the power to retain and determine the appropriate compensation for independent legal, accounting, financial and other advisors as the Audit Committee may deem necessary or appropriate to carry out its duties, at the expense of the Company; and (13) enforce the Company’s Code of Conduct and Ethics (the “Code of Conduct”). The Audit Committee has been established in accordance with Section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

The Board of Directors has determined that each member of the Audit Committee is independent under the independence standards discussed above, and that each member meets the additional independence standards applicable under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and related rules of the SEC and NASDAQ Marketplace Rules. In addition, the Board of Directors has determined that each of the current directors serving on the Audit Committee, Wesley S. McDonald, Edward N. Antoian and Todd R. Morgenfeld, qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” in accordance with the definition set forth in Item 407(d)(5)(ii) of Regulation S-K, as adopted by the SEC. In Fiscal 2022, the Audit Committee met eight times.  

Compensation Committee

The Compensation Committee operates under a written charter that has been approved by the Board of Directors. The charter is reviewed annually by the Compensation Committee with any recommended changes approved by the Board of Directors. The Compensation Committee is responsible for overseeing our compensation strategy and for the oversight and administration of our compensation programs including our stock incentive plans. The Compensation Committee: (1) annually reviews and determines the compensation of the Chief Executive Officer and all other executive officers, including the use of cash incentives and deferred compensation plans; (2) determines the Company’s policy with respect to the application of Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue of 1986, as amended (the “Code”); (3) approves compensation programs and grants involving the use of the Common Shares and other equity securities; (4) appoints (based on the consideration of certain factors set forth in the Compensation Committee charter), compensates and oversees the work of the compensation consultant retained by the committee; (5) prepares an annual report on executive compensation for inclusion in the Company’s proxy statement in accordance with applicable rules and regulations; and (6) reviews and discusses with management plans and programs to support the selection, development and retention of future leadership for the Company. The Board of Directors has determined that each member of the Compensation Committee is independent under the independence standards currently set forth in the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules. For a discussion of the role of executive officers and compensation consultants in determining executive and director compensation, see “Compensation of Executive Officers—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Design of Compensation Program” and “—Operation and Process—Role of Executive Officers in Establishing Compensation.” In Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee met four times.

Nominating Committee

The Nominating Committee operates under a written charter that has been approved by the Board of Directors. The charter is reviewed annually by the Nominating Committee with any recommended changes approved by the Board of Directors. The Nominating Committee, in consultation with our Chairman: (1) recommends to the Board of Directors for its selection (i) potential nominees for

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director to stand for election at the Company’s annual meeting of shareholders, including without limitation, those proposed by shareholders and (ii) individuals to be considered by the Board of Directors to fill vacancies; (2) establishes criteria for selecting new directors; (3) conducts, or causes to be conducted, background and qualifications checks of new director candidates; and (4) evaluates directors before nomination for re-election. The Nominating Committee also periodically reviews the Company’s corporate governance policies and practices and recommends to the Board of Directors any appropriate modifications. The Board of Directors has determined that each member of the Nominating Committee is independent under the independence standards currently set forth in the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules. In Fiscal 2022, the Nominating Committee met four times.

Director Nominations

The Nominating Committee recommends director nominees to the Board of Directors. The Nominating Committee seeks individuals with diverse experience from traditional corporate environments as well as from other sources who are qualified to be directors based on the Nominating Committee’s judgment of the potential candidate’s experience, skills and knowledge of business and management practices. If needed, the Nominating Committee will use a third-party search firm to assist in finding director candidates.

The Nominating Committee considers the diversity of directors as part of the overall mix of factors when identifying and evaluating candidates for the Board of Directors, although it does not have a formal policy. The Company considers diversity broadly to include differences of viewpoint, professional experience, individual characteristics, qualities and skills, resulting in naturally varying perspectives among the directors and individual skills that complement the full Board of Directors. The Nominating Committee strives to broaden the knowledge and viewpoints of the members of the Board of Directors. Therefore, the Board of Directors, as a unit, possesses the appropriate skills and experience to oversee the Company’s business.

The nominees for election to the Board of Directors consist of individuals with several different areas of expertise, including physical and digital retail, creative and design, brand strategy, social media, finance and accounting, hospitality, law, technology and consumer-sector experience.

The Nominating Committee will give appropriate consideration to qualified persons recommended by shareholders for nomination as directors and will evaluate such qualified persons in the same manner as other identified candidates, when submitted prior to the applicable shareholder proposal date referred to in the “Proposals for 2023 Annual Meeting” section of this Proxy Statement, provided such recommendations comply with the applicable procedures in the Company’s By-laws, which are summarized in that section. Shareholders may submit director recommendations in writing to the Nominating Committee at Urban Outfitters, Inc., 5000 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19112-1495. Such recommendations must also include: (i) sufficient biographical information about the proposed nominee to permit the Nominating Committee to evaluate his or her qualifications and experience and (ii) the nominee’s consent to being named in the proxy statement and to serving as a director if elected.

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Risk Management

The Board of Directors is actively involved in the oversight of risks that could affect the Company. This oversight is conducted primarily through the Audit Committee, but the full Board of Directors has retained responsibility for general oversight of risks. The Audit Committee, pursuant to its charter, considers and reviews with management, the Company’s internal audit department and the independent registered public accounting firm the adequacy of the Company’s internal controls, including the processes for identifying significant risks or exposures, and elicits recommendations for the improvements of such procedures where desirable.  Among other risks, the Audit Committee periodically reviews the Company’s data security and privacy policies, procedures and risks. The Company’s Data Protection Officer reports to the Audit Committee at least quarterly and provides the Audit Committee updates regarding the Company’s data privacy environment. The Company’s Chief Information Security Officer reports to the Audit Committee at least annually regarding the Company’s data security environment.   In addition to the Audit Committee’s role, the full Board of Directors is involved in oversight and administration of risk and risk management practices by overseeing members of senior management in their risk management capacities, regularly reviewing and analyzing the Company’s investment portfolio and accompanying risk levels and reviewing and analyzing inventory risk each quarter as part of the review of quarterly financial statements. Members of the Company’s senior management have day-to-day responsibility for risk management and establishing risk management practices, and members of management are expected to report matters relating specifically to the Audit Committee directly thereto and to report all other matters directly to the Board of Directors as a whole. Members of the Company’s senior management have an open line of communication to the Board of Directors and have the discretion to raise issues from time-to-time in any manner they deem appropriate, and management’s reporting on issues relating to risk management typically occurs through direct communication with directors or committee members as matters requiring attention typically arise. In addition, the Company maintains an Impact Committee, co-chaired by URBN’s Chief Sourcing Officer and its Chief Administrative Officer. The Impact Committee maintains functional Working Groups that focus on three areas: Environmental & Social, Data Privacy & Security, and Governance. The Impact Committee reports to the Board of Directors at least annually.

In addition to the Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee considers the risks that may be implicated with executive compensation, as discussed in “Compensation of Executive Officers—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Determination of Amount of Element; Relation of Elements to Primary Compensation Objectives—Setting Performance Criteria and Targets.”

 

Communications with Directors  

Shareholders may communicate with members of the Company’s Board of Directors by writing, as applicable, to the full Board of Directors, a particular committee or a specific director at Urban Outfitters, Inc., 5000 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19112-1495. The Company’s telephone number is (215) 454-5500 and its fax number is (215) 454-4660.

Annual Meeting

Pursuant to Company policy, the directors are expected to attend the Company’s annual meetings of shareholders. All of the Company’s current directors attended last year’s annual meeting of shareholders, except Ms. Campbell, who was not elected to the Board of Directors until December 2021.

Code of Conduct and Ethics

The Company has had a written code of conduct for a number of years. The Code of Conduct applies to the Company’s directors and employees, including its Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer. The Code of Conduct includes guidelines relating to compliance with laws, including anti-bribery and illegal payment laws, the ethical handling of actual or potential conflicts of interest, the use of corporate opportunities, the protection and use of the Company’s confidential information, the acceptance of gifts and business courtesies, accurate financial reporting, and procedures for promoting compliance with, and reporting violations of, the Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct is available on the Company’s corporate website at www.urbn.com. The Company intends to post any amendments to the Code of Conduct and also to disclose any waivers (to the extent applicable to the Company’s executive officers and directors) on its website.

 

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PROPOSAL 2.    RATIFICATION OF THE APPOINTMENT OF DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP AS
THE COMPANY’S INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM FOR
FISCAL YEAR 2023

The Audit Committee has appointed Deloitte & Touche LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm to audit the consolidated financial statements of the Company and the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting for Fiscal 2023 and to perform such other appropriate accounting services as may be approved by the Audit Committee. The Board of Directors proposes and recommends that shareholders ratify the appointment of Deloitte & Touche LLP as the independent registered public accounting firm for Fiscal 2023.

More information concerning the relationship of the Company with its independent registered public accounting firm appears above under the heading “Corporate Governance at Urban Outfitters—Audit Committee” and below under the headings “Relationships with Auditors” and “Audit Committee Report.”

If the shareholders do not ratify the appointment, the Audit Committee will take such vote into account in considering the retention of Deloitte & Touche LLP.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS A VOTE “FOR” THE RATIFICATION OF THE APPOINTMENT OF THE COMPANY’S INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM FOR FISCAL YEAR 2023.

 

 


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PROPOSAL 3.   APPROVAL OF THE AMENDED AND RESTATED URBAN OUTFITTERS 2017 STOCK INCENTIVE PLAN

At the meeting, you will be asked to approve the Amended and Restated Urban Outfitters 2017 Stock Incentive Plan (the “Amended 2017 Plan”). The Board of Directors originally approved the Urban Outfitters 2017 Stock Incentive Plan on December 12, 2016 (the “2017 Plan”) and our shareholders approved the 2017 Plan at the 2017 Annual Meeting on May 23, 2017. The Board of Directors approved the Amended 2017 Plan on March 25, 2022. The Amended 2017 Plan is being submitted for your approval in accordance with NASDAQ Marketplace Rules and to obtain favorable federal income tax treatment for incentive stock options under Section 422 of the Code.

The term of the Amended 2017 Plan has not been extended and the Amended 2017 Plan will expire (as originally intended) on December 11, 2026. The number of shares available under the Amended 2017 Plan (6,096,720 shares) is limited to the shares not issued or subject to awards granted under the 2017 Plan as of the date of the amendment and restatement.  Further, any shares that cease to be subject to awards under the 2017 Plan as a result of forfeiture will be made available under the Amended 2017 Plan.

The Company has made certain other changes including: (i) establishing minimum vesting and performance periods for all awards (subject to some limited exceptions); (ii) eliminating Administrator discretion to accelerate vesting of time-based awards; (iii) providing that cash dividends on restricted stock will be paid upon vesting; (iv) providing for double-trigger vesting upon a change of control, and (v) eliminating certain requirements, on a going forward basis, related to performance-based compensation to reflect the changes to Section 162(m) of the Code in light of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, enacted on December 22, 2017. The Company adopted a clawback/recoupment policy in 2021 and Awards granted under the Amended 2017 Plan will be made subject to this policy.

The Amended 2017 Plan is attached as Appendix A to this Proxy Statement. The following description of the Amended 2017 Plan is intended merely as a summary of its principal features and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the provisions of the Amended 2017 Plan.

General

Common Shares Available. The Company had reserved 10,000,000 Common Shares for issuance under the 2017 Plan. As of March 25, 2022, the number of Common Shares that will be available for future grants under the Amended 2017 Plan is 6,096,720.  This limit is subject to adjustment for certain changes in the Company’s capitalization such as stock dividends, stock splits, combinations or similar events. If an award expires, terminates, is forfeited or is settled in cash rather than in Common Shares, the Common Shares not issued under that award will again become available for grant under the Amended 2017 Plan. If Common Shares are surrendered to the Company or withheld to pay any exercise price or tax withholding requirements, only the number of Common Shares issued, net of the shares withheld or surrendered, will be counted against the number of Common Shares available under the Amended 2017 Plan.

No awards have been granted under the Amended 2017 Plan, subsequent to its adoption by the Board of Directors on March 25, 2022. As a result, no benefits or amounts that would have been received or allocated under the Amended 2017 Plan are determinable at this time. Accordingly, benefits or amounts which would have been granted for Fiscal 2022 if the Amended 2017 Plan had been in effect are also not determinable. The closing price of the Common Shares on March 24, 2022 was $25.42.

The minimum vesting schedule for awards under the Amended 2017 Plan (other than Stock grants) is the first anniversary of the grant date. The minimum vesting requirement does not apply to substitute awards granted in connection with a corporate transaction and grants to non-employee directors that vest on the earlier of the one-year anniversary of the grant date or the next annual meeting of shareholders. The number of shares available for grants to directors that provide for vesting earlier than the first anniversary of the grant date is limited to 5% of the shares available for grant under the Amended 2017 Plan.

Administration. Two committees have authority to administer the Amended 2017 Plan. The first committee, of which the Chairman of the Board is the sole member, administers the Amended 2017 Plan for awards that relate to 40,000 or fewer Common Shares and are made to individuals not subject to Section 16(b) of the Exchange Act, and who were not Named Executive Officers of the Company whose compensation was listed in the Summary Compensation Table of the Company’s most recent proxy filing or who is the Chief Executive Officer or the Chief Financial Officer of the Company immediately prior to the grant date. The Compensation Committee administers the Amended 2017 Plan for all other awards. These committees are referred to collectively as the “Administrator.” The Administrator has considerable discretion in setting the terms of awards granted to employees, consultants, and non-employee directors.

Types of Awards. Under the Amended 2017 Plan, the Administrator may award incentive stock options, non-qualified stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock (including performance stock), restricted stock units (including performance stock units) and stock grants.

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Eligibility. Employees and consultants of the Company and its subsidiaries and non-employee directors of the Company are eligible to receive awards under the Amended 2017 Plan. Non-employee directors and consultants are not eligible to receive incentive stock options. The Administrator selects the employees, non-employee directors and consultants who will receive options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock awards, restricted stock units and stock grants under the Amended 2017 Plan. All of the Company’s approximately 23,000 employees and its 9 non-employee directors are currently eligible to receive awards under the Amended 2017 Plan, as well as a limited number of consultants, not currently determinable. The Company’s executive officers and directors have an interest in approval of the Amended 2017 Plan because it relates to the issuance of equity awards for which executive officers and directors may be eligible.

Stock Options

The Administrator may award incentive stock options and non-qualified stock options. Incentive stock options offer employees certain tax advantages that are not available for non-qualified stock options. The Administrator determines the terms of the options, including the number of Common Shares subject to the option, the exercise price and when the option becomes exercisable. The option term of incentive stock options may not exceed ten years, and the per share exercise price of options may not be less than the fair market value of a Common Share on the date the option is granted.

When an employee, non-employee director or consultant terminates service with the Company, his or her option may expire before the end of the otherwise applicable option term. For example, if an employee, non-employee director or consultant terminates his or her service with the Company for a reason other than death or disability, his or her options generally remain exercisable for up to 30 days after termination of service, unless the award agreement provides otherwise. If the employee, non-employee director or consultant terminates his or her service with the Company due to disability, his or her options generally remain exercisable for up to six months after termination of service, unless the award agreement provides otherwise. If the employee, non-employee director or consultant terminates service with the Company due to death, or dies following his or her termination of service but prior to the expiration of the option, his or her options generally remain exercisable for up to six months after the date of the grantee’s death unless the award agreement provides otherwise.

An employee, non-employee director or consultant may pay the exercise price of an option in cash or, if permitted by the Administrator, its equivalent. The Administrator may also permit an optionee to pay the exercise price by surrendering previously acquired Common Shares, by decreasing the number of Common Shares for which the option is exercisable, through a so-called “broker-financed transaction” or in any combination of such methods. The Administrator may permit or require an employee to pay any tax withholding obligation with Common Shares issuable upon the exercise of the non-qualified stock option or previously acquired shares.

Stock Appreciation Rights

The Administrator may award stock appreciation rights to employees, non-employee directors and consultants. A stock appreciation right entitles the grantee to receive an amount equal to the excess of the fair market value of the Common Shares on the date of exercise over the fair market value on the date of grant. The Administrator determines when the stock appreciation right becomes exercisable and whether the appreciation will be paid in cash, Common Shares, or a combination of cash and Common Shares.

When an employee, non-employee director or consultant terminates service, dies or becomes disabled, his or her stock appreciation rights may expire before the end of the otherwise applicable stock appreciation right term. The period during which the stock appreciation right may be exercised is the same as the period for options, discussed above.

Restricted Stock

The Administrator may make restricted stock awards to employees, non-employee directors and consultants. A restricted stock award is an award of Common Shares that is subject to certain restrictions during a specified period. The Administrator determines the length of the restriction period and the conditions, such as an employee’s continued employment with the Company or the achievement of certain performance goals, which must be met for the restrictions to lapse. The Company holds the Common Shares during the restriction period, and the grantee cannot transfer the shares before termination of that period. The grantee is, however, generally entitled to vote the Common Shares. Any cash dividends with respect to a grantee’s restricted stock will be paid to the grantee upon vesting.

 

For performance stock awards, the restrictions lapse only to the extent performance goals established by the Compensation Committee are met or the Compensation Committee waives the performance goal in the case of death or disability. The Compensation Committee has discretion to exclude the positive and/or negative results of material events that it does not believe should affect the calculation of the achievement of performance goals, such as impairment of assets and goodwill, legal judgments and settlements, foreign currency exchange rates, force majeure events, major corporate events such as acquisitions, divestitures and restructuring, material changes in laws and regulations, cost or approved corporate initiatives, and other matters that management may recommend

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to the Compensation Committee. In the case of a termination of service, the Compensation Committee may provide that the restrictions lapse with respect to a pro-rata portion of the number of shares that would have lapsed if the grantee had been employed on the last day of the performance period. The Compensation Committee may select one or more performance criteria for each performance stock award from the following list: sales, profit, return on sales, net operating profit after taxes, investment turnover, customer service indices, funds from operations, income from operations, return on assets, return on net assets, asset turnover, return on equity, return on capital, market price of Common Shares, economic value added, total shareholder return, net income, pre-tax income, earnings per share, operating profit margin, net income margin, sales margin, cash flow, market share, inventory turnover, sales growth, net revenue growth, capacity utilization, new stores opened, customer penetration, increase in customer base, net income growth, expense control and hiring of personnel. The criteria may be applied to the individual, a division, a component of the Company’s business, the Company and or one or more related corporations of the Company and may be weighted and expressed in absolute terms or relative to the performance of other individuals or companies or an index.

Restricted Stock Units

The Administrator may award restricted stock units to employees, non-employee directors and consultants. Each restricted stock unit represents the right to receive one Common Share or cash equal to the fair market value of a Common Share, when the restricted stock unit vests. A bookkeeping account is established for each recipient of a restricted stock unit award that shows the number of restricted stock units granted, as well as full and fractional restricted stock units representing any cash dividends prior to the date the restricted stock unit vests. The Administrator determines the conditions, such as continued service with the Company or the achievement of certain performance goals that must be met for restricted stock units to vest.

Performance stock units vest only to the extent performance goals established by the Compensation Committee are met or the Compensation Committee waives the performance goal in the case of death or disability. The Compensation Committee has discretion to exclude the positive and/or negative results of material events that it does not believe should affect the calculation of the achievement of performance goals, such as impairment of assets and goodwill, legal judgments and settlements, foreign currency exchange rates, force majeure events, major corporate events such as acquisitions, divestitures and restructuring, material changes in laws and regulations, cost or approved corporate initiatives, and other matters that management may recommend to the Compensation Committee. In the case of a termination of service, the Compensation Committee may provide for the pro-rata vesting of performance stock units that would have vested if the grantee had been employed on the last day of the performance period. The Compensation Committee may select one or more performance criteria for each award of performance stock units from the above list for performance stock awards.

Stock Grants

The Administrator may make stock grants to employees, non-employee directors and consultants. Stock grants are fully vested when made.

Miscellaneous

Transferability. Awards generally are not transferable, except by will or under the laws of descent and distribution. Non-employee directors may transfer non-qualified stock options and stock appreciation rights to certain permitted transferees for no consideration, however, and the Administrator has the authority to permit similar transfers with respect to other non-qualified stock options and stock appreciation rights.

Clawback. A grantee’s right to receive or retain an award or any amount received thereunder, or to retain any profit or gain realized in connection with an award, is subject to the Clawback/Recoupment Policy adopted by the Company effective December 7, 2021 and as it may be amended from time to time.

No Discretion to Accelerate Vesting; Double Trigger Vesting Upon a Change in Control. The Administrator does not have discretion to accelerate the date on which options and stock appreciation rights may be exercised, and may not accelerate the date of termination of the restrictions applicable to restricted stock (other than performance stock) and restricted stock units (other than performance stock units). Upon a change in control of the Company (as defined in the Amended 2017 Plan), all outstanding options and stock appreciation rights become exercisable, and all outstanding restricted stock (including performance stock) and restricted stock units (including performance stock units) become vested, in each case, upon the grantee’s involuntary termination of service without cause or upon the grantee’s resignation for “good reason” (in each case) as of (or within 12 months after) the change in control.

Change in Capitalization/Certain Corporate Transactions. If there is a change in the Company’s capitalization that affects its outstanding Common Shares, the aggregate number and type of Common Shares subject to awards, together with the option exercise price, will be adjusted by the Administrator, as described in the Amended 2017 Plan. The Amended 2017 Plan also provides that, in the event of a merger, consolidation or other specified corporate transaction, outstanding awards will be assumed by the surviving or

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successor corporation, if any. The Amended 2017 Plan also authorizes the Administrator to terminate the awards granted to employees, non-employee directors and consultants in the event of such a corporate transaction, after giving advance notice.

Effective Date. The Amended 2017 Plan became effective on March 25, 2022, subject to shareholder approval. If the requisite shareholder approval is not obtained within 12 months, the Amended 2017 Plan and all awards granted under the Amended 2017 Plan will be null and void.

Amendment/Termination. The Administrator may amend outstanding awards. The Board of Directors may amend or suspend the Amended 2017 Plan. Shareholder approval, however, is required for any material amendment (as defined under applicable NASDAQ Marketplace Rules) to the Amended 2017 Plan, as well as for certain other amendments, such as an increase in the number of Common Shares authorized for issuance of incentive stock options and a change in the class of employees who may receive incentive stock options under the Amended 2017 Plan.

The Board of Directors may terminate the Amended 2017 Plan at any time and for any reason. No incentive stock options may be granted under the Amended 2017 Plan after December 11, 2026.

Federal Income Tax Consequences-Options

The Company has been advised that the federal income tax consequences of granting and exercising options under the Amended 2017 Plan are as follows (based on federal tax laws and regulations, as of January 1, 2022). The grant of an option does not result in federal income tax consequences for the optionee or a deduction for the Company.

When an option is exercised, the federal income tax consequences depend on whether the option is an incentive stock option or a non-qualified stock option. An optionee exercising a non-qualified stock option will recognize ordinary income equal to the difference between the fair market value of the stock exercised (on the date of exercise) and the option price. An employee will not recognize taxable income as a result of acquiring stock by exercising an incentive stock option. The difference between the fair market value of the exercised stock on the date of exercise and the exercise price will, however, generally be treated as an item of adjustment for purposes of alternative minimum taxable income. If the employee holds the stock he receives on exercise of an incentive stock option for a required period of time, the employee will have capital gain (or loss) when the stock is later disposed of. If the employee does not hold the stock for the required period of time, the employee will generally have ordinary income when the stock is disposed of.

When an optionee recognizes ordinary income on the exercise of a non-qualified stock option or the sale of stock acquired on exercise of an incentive stock option, the Company is generally entitled to a deduction in the same amount.  

The Company has registered the Common Shares available for issuance under the 2017 Plan pursuant to a Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Commission on July 14, 2017.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS A VOTE “FOR” APPROVAL OF THE AMENDED AND RESTATED URBAN OUTFITTERS 2017 STOCK INCENTIVE PLAN.

 

 

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PROPOSAL 4.    Shareholder advisory vote on executive
compensation  

Pursuant to Section 14A of the Exchange Act, we are seeking a non-binding advisory vote from our shareholders to approve the compensation of our named executive officers, as set forth in this Proxy Statement. This vote is intended to provide an overall assessment of our executive compensation program rather than focus on any specific item of compensation. Based on an advisory vote at our 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, it is our current policy to hold an advisory vote on the compensation of our named executive officers every year.

At the Company’s 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, our shareholders approved, with approximately 89% of the votes cast, the compensation of our named executive officers. The Company welcomes our shareholders’ views on this subject, and our Board of Directors and Compensation Committee will carefully consider the outcome of this vote consistent with the best interests of all shareholders. As an advisory vote, however, the outcome is not binding on the Company, the Board of Directors or the Compensation Committee.

As described in detail under the heading “Compensation of Executive Officers—Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” the Company’s executive compensation program is designed to attract, retain, and motivate executive and key employee talent in support of its primary objective of building compelling brands that connect with the customer on an emotional level. Please read the Compensation Discussion and Analysis for additional details about our executive compensation programs, including information about the Fiscal 2022 compensation of our named executive officers. Specifically, we are seeking a vote on the following resolution:

RESOLVED, that the shareholders approve, on an advisory basis, the compensation of the Company’s named executive officers as disclosed in this Proxy Statement pursuant to the compensation disclosure rules of the SEC, including the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, the compensation tables and related narrative discussion.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS A VOTE “FOR” THE RESOLUTION ABOVE TO APPROVE EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

 


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PROPOSAL 5.  SHAREHOLDER PROPOSAL REGARDING

SUPPLY CHAIN REPORT

 

The Company expects the following shareholder proposal (the “Shareholder Proposal”) to be presented for consideration at the Annual Meeting. The proposal quoted below was submitted by Teamster Affiliates Pension Plan, 25 Louisiana Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001, which beneficially owned at least $2,000 worth of Common Shares as of November 30, 2021.

 

Shareholder Proposal and Shareholder’s Supporting Statement

 

RESOLVED: Urban Outfitters, Inc.’s Board of Directors to prepare a report on the financial, reputational, and human rights risks resulting from the use in the Company’s supply chain and distribution networks of companies that misclassify employees as independent contractors. The report should be prepared at reasonable cost, omitting proprietary information and be available at least 90 days prior to the 2023 annual shareholders meeting.

Supporting Statement:

 

Urban Outfitters’ Vendor Code of Conduct & Responsible Sourcing Policy affirms it sources from companies complying with laws governing wages, hours and benefits; provides workers with clear terms of employment; does not subject employees to harassment and abuse; and respects workers’ right to freedom of association. The company’s Human Rights Policy complements this policy by emphasizing the importance of “human rights and sustainability issues” as to its “internal sourcing partners and external suppliers.” Nonetheless, Urban Outfitters fails to address an issue affecting reputational and financial risks and human rights concerns.

 

Supply chain disruptions are a major challenge facing retailers amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Exacerbating this is the fact some of the trucking companies used by retailers may misclassify their drivers as “independent contractors” rather than “employees.”

 

It is illegal for a company to “misclassify” workers as self-employed “independent contractors” if the company controls the manner and means of work, sets hours and wages, and otherwise treats them as “employees,” who are entitled to a minimum wage, overtime pay protections, and other benefits and rights guaranteed employees under federal and state law. The forgone wages, amount to “wage theft.”

 

Misclassification is a significant problem as some trucking companies misclassify drivers hauling goods from U.S. ports.

 

Following an award-winning, investigative series by USA Today, the paper’s editorial board compared exploitive independent contractor arrangements at southern California ports to “modern-day … indentured servitude,” prompting four U.S. Senators to demand major U.S. retailers cut ties with trucking companies showing such a “brazen disregard for … workers’ safety and rights.” The southern California ports process 40% of all U.S. shipping container traffic.

 

In response to this situation, the California Labor Commissioner’s office has over the past decade awarded more than $50 million to misclassified port drivers, while millions of dollars have been awarded in private litigation involving port drivers. According to a 2014 report by the National Employment Law Project, the Californian port trucking industry is potentially liable for $850 million in wage theft each year from misclassification. (https://www.nelp.org/ wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Big-Rig-Overhaul-Misclassification-Port-Truck-Drivers-Labor-Law-Enforcement.pdf)

 

Misclassification risk extends to retailers, given recent Californian legislation. A 2021 law, SB 338, indicates there could be 16,000 misclassified drivers in California’s ports and calls this largely “immigrant workforce” the “last American sharecroppers.” The law makes customers of port trucking companies jointly liable for future violations of labor, employment, and health and safety law by a trucking company that the California Labor Commissioner’s office has publicly identified as having previously violated these laws.

 

We urge shareholders to vote FOR this proposal.

 

The Board of Directors’ Response

 

After careful consideration, and for the reasons described below, the Board does not believe it is in the Company’s or its shareholders’ best interest to implement the Shareholder Proposal because:

 

 

the Company’s present practices and procedures appropriately and adequately address the concerns raised in the Shareholder Proposal; and

 

the adoption of the Shareholder Proposal would impose an unnecessary burden and expense on the Company without benefit to its shareholders.  

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The Shareholder Proposal is redundant because the Company already has adopted policies that address not only the economic risks that are the focus of the proposal, but also the fundamental rights and freedoms of the workers who supply products to the Company (“Workers”). The Company strongly supports freedom and human rights for Workers, and actively seeks to foster a culture of ethical behavior and integrity, free of coercion and intimidation. The Company is committed to making supplier decisions with legal, social and environmental factors in mind.

 

This commitment is embodied in the Company’s Vendor Code of Conduct and Responsible Sourcing Policy (the “Vendor and Supplier Code”), which sets forth standards for the Company’s vendors and suppliers and is available on the Company’s website.  The Vendor and Supplier Code addresses, among other things, employment practices, anti-discrimination and fair treatment, underage labor, wages, overtime and hours, benefits and the work-place environment.  The Vendor and Supplier Code does more than simply require reporting on human rights risks in the Company’s supply chain.  It prohibits those who do business with the Company from engaging in the type of conduct of concern to the Company and the proponents and requires vendors and their suppliers be in full compliance with all applicable laws and regulations of applicable jurisdictions, including those related to classification of workers.  The Company’s policy is not to do business with those who are in violation of its Vendor and Supplier Code.  Furthermore, the Vendor and Supplier Code provides a variety of resources to enable employees to report concerns or suspected violations.  The Company has a robust compliance program in place concerning the Vendor and Supplier Code – founded on third party audits – that is regularly monitored to ensure that vendors and suppliers are meeting important human rights standards and conditions of employment.

 

The Company’s commitment to legal and ethical business practices is also reflected in the Company’s Code of Conduct and Ethics (the “Code”), which is available on the Company’s investor relations page at Responsible Sourcing | Urban Outfitters, Inc. – IR Site (urbn.com).  The Code establishes policies and practices that address business ethics and a wide range of employment and workplace issues, including the health, wellness and safety of the Company’s employees, as well as unacceptable workplace conduct and harassment. The Company also employs a Social Compliance team to monitor the results of compliance assessments. The Social Compliance team receives ongoing training and continuing education on human rights and sustainability issues and shares their expertise with both internal sourcing partners and external suppliers.  

 

The Company also does not believe that preparing a report on the risks resulting from the use in the Company’s supply chain and distribution networks of companies that misclassify employees as independent contractors would benefit our shareholders. In light of the existing policies and processes the Company maintains to avoid violations of Workers’ freedom and rights, as well as to address and minimize economic risks that might stem from such violations, the Board of Directors believes the additional reporting requested by the proposal is unnecessary. Rather, the burden and cost would far outweigh any benefits to shareholders. The Board of Directors believes that the proposal represents the potential for a diversion of resources with no corresponding benefit to the Company, Workers, customers or shareholders. The Company’s shareholders have rejected similar proposals relating to vendor practices and workers’ rights in previous years that would have also diverted the Company’s resources without appreciable benefits, most recently in 2019 and 2015.

 

For the foregoing reasons, the Board of Directors unanimously believes that this proposal is not in the best interests of the Company or its shareholders and recommends that you vote “AGAINST” Proposal 5.  Proxies solicited by the Board of Directors will be voted “AGAINST” this proposal unless a shareholder has otherwise indicated in voting the proxy.

 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS UNANIMOUSLY RECOMMENDS A VOTE “AGAINST” THE SHAREHOLDER PROPOSAL 5.

 

 


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OTHER MATTERS

The Board of Directors knows of no matters to be presented for action at the Annual Meeting, other than those set forth herein and in the attached notice and customary procedural matters. If any other matters should properly come before the Annual Meeting or any adjournments or postponements thereof, the proxies solicited hereby will be voted on such matters, to the extent permitted by the rules and regulations of the SEC, in accordance with the judgment of the persons voting such proxies.

COMPENSATION OF DIRECTORS

FISCAL 2022

 

Name

 

Fees

Earned

or Paid

in Cash

($)

 

 

Stock

Awards

($)

 

 

 

Option

Awards(4)

($)

 

 

 

Total

($)

 

Edward N. Antoian

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

Kelly Campbell

 

 

50,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50,000

 

Sukhinder Singh Cassidy

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

Harry S. Cherken, Jr.

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

Elizabeth Ann Lambert

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

Amin N. Maredia

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

Wesley S. McDonald

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

Todd R. Morgenfeld

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

John C. Mulliken

 

 

100,000

 

 

151,320(1)(2)(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

251,320

 

 

1 

The grant date fair value of the Restricted Stock Units (RSUs) granted on June 8, 2021, was $38.80 per share, which equaled the stock price on the date of the grant.  The aggregate grant date fair value (“Aggregate Fair Value”) of these RSUs was $151,320 (3,900 shares x $38.80 per share) for each grantee.

 

2

Fiscal 2022 RSU expense for each grantee was $98,254 relating to the June 8, 2021, grant and $49,909 relating to a grant made on June 2, 2020.  The RSUs granted on June 2, 2020, had a grant date fair value of $17.99 per share, which also equaled the stock price on the date of grant. Messrs. Maredia and Mulliken were elected to the Board of Directors on November 30, 2020, and, therefore, did not receive the June 2, 2020, grant.

 

3

As of January 31, 2022, the total number of outstanding stock awards held by our current non-employee directors was as follows:  Mr. Antoian, 3,900; Ms. Campbell, 0; Ms. Singh Cassidy, 3,900; Mr. Cherken, 3,900; Ms. Lambert, 3,900; Mr. McDonald, 3,900; Mr. Morgenfeld, 3,900; Mr. Maredia, 3,900; and Mr. Mulliken, 3,900.

 

4

As of January 31, 2022, the total number of outstanding stock options held by our current non-employee directors was as follows: Mr. Antoian, 100,000; Ms. Campbell, 0; Ms. Singh Cassidy, 30,000; Mr. Cherken, 100,000; Ms. Lambert, 100,000; Mr. McDonald, 10,000; Mr. Morgenfeld, 15,000; Mr. Maredia, 0; and Mr. Mulliken, 0.  

 

For a discussion of the methodology used to determine the fair value of awards in Fiscal 2022 and Fiscal 2021, please see the “Share-Based Compensation” note to the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which is included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022.

Each non-employee director is paid two cash installments consisting of (i) a $50,000 payment in August, following the Company’s annual meeting of shareholders, and (ii) a $50,000 payment upon completion of the fiscal year.

During Fiscal 2022, the Company granted, on a discretionary basis, each non-employee director serving on June 7, 2021, 3,900 Restricted Stock Units (“RSUs”) under the 2017 Plan (as defined below). The grant date fair value of each RSU granted under the 2017 Plan was $38.80.

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All directors and their immediate family members are eligible to receive discounts on our merchandise through use of discount cards issued to them and in accordance with our employee merchandise discount policy.  

The Board of Directors believes it is good corporate practice to periodically review and re-evaluate the total compensation paid to the Company’s non-employee directors for their service on the Board of Directors, including the cash and equity components of that compensation. The Board of Directors intends to review the compensation paid to the non-employee directors following the Annual Meeting and will make any adjustments it deems appropriate.

 

24


 

 

COMPENSATION OF EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

Compensation Discussion and Analysis

Company Objectives

The Company’s compensation program is designed to attract, retain and motivate executive and key employee talent in support of its primary objective of building compelling brands that connect with the customer on an emotional level. The Company believes that delivering value to the customer by excelling at “experiential retailing” is the foundation for the long-term maximization of shareholder value.

Design of Compensation Program

General

In furtherance of our primary objective, our compensation program is designed to motivate executives to maximize shareholder value and grow our brands, both in the short-term and the long-term, by rewarding executives for doing so. Our compensation program seeks to establish balanced performance metrics that promote disciplined progress towards longer-term goals and that correlate to the revenue and profit objectives of, and appropriate risk to, the Company. The majority of our executive officers’ total compensation is comprised of a combination of performance-based compensation and equity-based awards, which derive their benefit from increases in shareholder value. This furthers our core compensation principle of providing pay for both individual and Company-wide performance. These long-standing compensation policies were designed and approved by management, the Compensation Committee and/or the Board of Directors, as appropriate. In addition, at the 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, our shareholders approved our executive compensation program. We have identified the first step in attaining these objectives as having superior executives in place, and as such, our compensation program’s initial purpose is to attract and retain exceptional executive leadership. This requires our compensation to be competitive in the marketplace. The other step in attaining our objectives is to reward these executives through annual performance-based compensation based on the achievement of specific operating goals that have been determined by the Compensation Committee based on recommendations by our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Moreover, through equity-based compensation, we attempt to align the compensation of our executives with the interests of the shareholders and motivate our executives to achieve the Company’s longer-term goals.

Long-Term Versus Currently Paid Out Compensation

Current compensation paid to executive officers includes base salaries, which are paid periodically throughout the fiscal year, and performance bonuses, which are awarded at the end of the fiscal year. The Company’s long-term compensation is generally comprised of a combination of performance stock units and restricted stock units. The Company has long believed that the characteristics of equity-based compensation, particularly the extended vesting periods and, in the case of performance stock units, performance targets conditioned on achieving Company financial growth objectives, are closely aligned with maximizing shareholder value, supporting its long-term growth strategies and aligning compensation with risk outcomes. The Company believes that equity-based compensation awards made in Fiscal 2020, Fiscal 2021 and Fiscal 2022 share these characteristics and offer the potential for meaningful compensation for superior performance measured over an extended period of time.

Beginning February 1, 2013, the Company allowed certain employees, including the Company’s named executive officers, an opportunity to participate in the Urban Outfitters Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan (the “Deferred Compensation Plan”). The Deferred Compensation Plan is discussed more fully below in “Equity-Based Incentives—Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan.” As a matter of practice and philosophy, the Company has significantly limited the scope and value of perquisites provided to executive officers. None of the named executive officers currently participate in the Deferred Compensation Plan.

The Company’s compensation structure attempts to balance the ongoing cash requirements of the named executive officers for current income with the Company’s desire to create long-term incentives that are directly tied to growth in shareholder value. There is no pre-determined allocation between current and long-term compensation; the Compensation Committee maintains flexibility in this regard. Historically, however, long-term equity compensation and short-term performance-based incentive compensation has provided the majority of income that named executive officers have derived from their employment with the Company. In recognition of this, the Compensation Committee takes the performance of the Common Shares (and therefore the perceived value of them to the executive) into consideration when making compensation decisions for each executive. Different positions may yield a different balance between cash and equity compensation in light of what the Compensation Committee decides will best further the Company’s objectives. For example, in Fiscal 2022, the bonus potential for brand leaders could have equaled or exceeded their base salary. This reflects the Company’s emphasis on the specific brand-related performance goals tied to the bonus for these particular executives. The maximum bonus potential in Fiscal 2022 for Francis J. Conforti, Co-President and Chief Operating Officer, was 150% of his base salary. His bonus plan, which was set in early Fiscal 2022, consisted of financial metrics related to the revenue and profitability of the Anthropologie, Free People, and Urban Outfitters brands, representing 50% of his maximum potential bonus, as well as individual goals aligned to Company strategic initiatives representing the other 50% of his maximum potential bonus. The different elements of compensation are discussed more fully below in “Determination of Amount of Element; Relation of Elements to Primary Compensation Objectives.”

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In the beginning of Fiscal 2009, citing his ownership of a substantial number of Common Shares and his confidence in the Company’s future performance, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Richard A. Hayne, requested that his base salary be set at $1.00 per year, and the Compensation Committee continues to honor his request. Prior to the suspension of performance bonuses discussed below in “Determination of Amount of Element; Relation of Elements to Primary Compensation Objectives”, Mr. Hayne remained eligible to receive a performance bonus in Fiscal 2022, which was tied to revenue and profitability metrics. The performance criteria were based on two incremental levels (i.e. “Plan” level and “Goal” level). The Compensation Committee chose to focus on brand financial performance instead of Company-wide performance in order to create appropriate incentives for Fiscal 2022. The Compensation Committee provided “Plan” and “Goal” levels as the most appropriate measurements in Fiscal 2022.  

Operation and Process

Compensation Committee

The Company’s Compensation Committee, acting pursuant to its charter, sets the amount of each element of compensation for each named executive officer, as described herein and under “Corporate Governance at Urban Outfitters—Compensation Committee.” The Compensation Committee generally holds meetings at least four times a year, and compensation amounts for executive officers for the new fiscal year are generally set in the Company’s first fiscal quarter. In Fiscal 2022, there were four meetings of the Compensation Committee.

The Compensation Committee is currently comprised of four members, Todd R. Morgenfeld (who is the Compensation Committee’s chairman), Elizabeth Ann Lambert, Amin N. Maredia and Wesley S. McDonald, all of whom are “independent” directors, as defined by the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules. As previously mentioned, Ms. Lambert will not be standing for re-election. At this time, the Board of Directors has not made any determination regarding Ms. Lambert’s replacement on the Compensation Committee. The Compensation Committee charter is available on the Company’s corporate website at www.urbn.com. The charter is reviewed by the Compensation Committee on an annual basis and revised as warranted.

Compensation Committee Consultant

Korn Ferry Hay Group (“Korn Ferry”) has served as a compensation consultant to the Compensation Committee since February 2018, providing advice on executive compensation matters. The Compensation Committee and the Board of Directors have discretion to appoint and terminate the consultant, as described in the Compensation Committee’s charter. The Compensation Committee determines the scope of the consultant’s review. The compensation consultant typically provides benchmarking data for each individual executive against the Company’s designated peer group, as well as more general recommendations regarding the Company’s compensation structure. Korn Ferry sends its invoices for the compensation consultant’s services directly to the Compensation Committee, which reviews the invoices and then forwards them to the Company for payment.  During Fiscal 2022, the Company paid $93,720 to Korn Ferry for services rendered.

Role of Executive Officers in Establishing Compensation

The Compensation Committee is solely responsible for compensation determinations and compensation policies applicable to executive officers, as well as other matters provided in the Compensation Committee charter. Neither the Company’s Chief Executive Officer nor any other executive officer makes any such determinations or sets any such policies. The Compensation Committee does consult with the Chief Executive Officer in determining compensation levels for each other named executive officer, and the Compensation Committee takes his assessment of the performance of such named executive officers into consideration when weighing the factors and setting compensation. The Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Administrative Officer and other executive officers may attend portions of certain meetings of the Compensation Committee as needed.  

Neither the Chief Executive Officer nor any other officer has the authority to call Compensation Committee meetings or set meeting agendas themselves, nor do they meet with the compensation consultant on an individual basis without the consent of the Compensation Committee or its chairman.

The Chief Executive Officer has the primary role in making recommendations to the Compensation Committee regarding the assessment and design of programs, plans and awards. He is assisted by the Chief Operating Officer, the Chief Financial Officer, and the Chief Administrative Officer who provide him with information and input on these items.

26


 

Elements of Compensation

The Company’s compensation program is comprised of three main elements: (1) base salary, (2) performance bonus and (3) equity-based incentives, including, performance stock units and restricted stock units.

The Board of Directors has evaluated the Company’s overall compensation policies and practices for its employees to determine whether such policies and practices create incentives that can affect the Company’s risk and management of that risk and has further assessed whether any risks arising from these policies and practices are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the Company. In connection with the evaluation, the Board of Directors considered, among other factors, the distribution of risk among the Company’s brands and segments, the overall mixture of compensation elements used to incentivize employees and the Company’s use of balanced performance metrics that promote disciplined progress towards longer-term goals. Based on its evaluation, the Board of Directors has concluded that the risks arising from the Company’s overall compensation policies and practices are not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the Company.

Selection of Elements

The Compensation Committee has chosen to utilize base salary, performance bonus and equity-based incentives because it believes such a compensation package, taken as a whole, is both competitive in the marketplace and directly reflects the Company’s primary objective of maximizing shareholder value and growing its brands. The rationale for the selection of each particular element is discussed in detail below.

 

Determination of Amount of Element; Relation of Elements to Primary Compensation Objectives  

The Compensation Committee reviews the amounts payable to each executive under each individual element of compensation, as well as the aggregate amount of actual and potential compensation to such executive, in making compensation decisions. In Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee benchmarked the Company’s executive compensation structure against its designated peer group and directed a number of changes for Fiscal 2022 and Fiscal 2023. As discussed further in “Security Ownership Guidelines” below, in Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee recommended and the Board of Directors adopted equity holding requirements for Directors and executive officers. The Compensation Committee also recommended and the Board of Directors adopt changes to the Company’s form equity award agreements, adding a double-trigger change of control provision as well as a clawback provision. For Fiscal 2023, as discussed in more detail in “Performance Bonuses” below, the Compensation Committee adopted a revised short term incentive structure for performance bonuses. Based on its benchmarking work, the Compensation Committee moved from its previous “cliff” target and award structure to a “threshold,” “target,” and “max” award and target structure for performance bonuses. The Compensation Committee also chose to reduce allocations to personal strategic goals, in favor of increased allocations to Company or brand financial metrics.

Base Salaries

Base salary is determined by position, experience and competitive market factors for comparable talent. Inasmuch as the main objective of the compensation plan is maximizing shareholder value, the Company generally seeks to set base salaries at or near prevailing market rates for comparable levels of responsibility in specialty retail so as to reduce the levels of committed compensation expense on the Company’s financial statements as well as the cash cost to the Company. The Company believes that it needs to offer competitive base salaries in order to retain and attract superior personnel, which is a key step in achieving its primary objectives.

Performance Bonuses

The Company’s executive officers are typically eligible to receive cash incentive bonuses based on the achievement of specific performance targets established in advance under the Urban Outfitters Executive Incentive Plan (as amended, the “Incentive Plan”). In determining performance objectives, the Compensation Committee sets forth specific targets that are consistent with its primary objectives. We believe that this presents the executive with clear objectives that, if achieved, will maximize shareholder value and further the growth of our brands while providing commensurate rewards to the executive.

 

For Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee set the performance criteria for each participant, including our named executive officers, in the first fiscal quarter. Eligibility for performance bonuses, the methodology for setting the performance criteria and targets, the role of executive officers in determining performance factors and the methodology for measuring achievement at the end of the fiscal year are all described below.

Eligibility

The Compensation Committee determines executive officer eligibility for performance bonuses during the Company’s first fiscal quarter based on the Company’s financial budgets and operating plans and the roles that the executives have in achieving those objectives.

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Setting Performance Criteria and Targets

Each year, the Compensation Committee sets the performance criteria, targets and payouts for each participant during the Company’s first fiscal quarter in light of the Company’s growth strategy, major initiatives and current and projected operations and objectives. The criteria may be based on the performance of the participant, a division, the Company as a whole or a subsidiary of the Company, at the Compensation Committee’s discretion. The Compensation Committee determines performance criteria that are appropriate for each participant. The Compensation Committee may also take into account the opinion of the named executive officer as to which criteria he or she feels is the best indicator of his or her performance. After a reasonable evaluation, the Compensation Committee concluded that while the criteria or targets for Fiscal 2022 reward prudent risk-taking in support of the Company’s objectives, they do not encourage or promote inappropriate risk-taking by the participants.  

Typically, at least 50% of an executive’s potential bonus is based on achievement of Company or brand financial goals (“Financial Goals”), with the remainder of the potential bonus based on individual goals for achievement of Company strategic efforts (“Personal Goals”). For Brand CEOs and Presidents, Financial Goals are typically tied to their individual brand financials. For executives who do not have merchant responsibilities, such as the Chief Operating Officer, Financial Goals are typically tied either to the performance of Anthropologie, Urban Outfitters, and Free People individually, or to overall URBN performance.

For Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee chose to weight the CEO and the Chief Creative Officer and Co-President bonuses at 100% Financial Goals, split evenly between the Net Sales and Operating Income of Anthropologie, Urban Outfitters, and Free People. The Compensation Committee weighted the Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer at 50% Financial Goals, split evenly between the Net Sales and Operating Income of Anthropologie, Urban Outfitters, and Free People, and 50% to Personal Goals. For the CEO of Urban Outfitters and Free People, the Compensation Committee chose to weight 70% to Financial Goals, split evenly between the Net Sales and Operating Income of Urban Outfitters and Free People, and 30% to Personal Goals. The performance targets and achievement for the Company’s named executive officers for Fiscal 2022 are described below in “—Measuring Achievement: Payment of Bonuses.”

For Fiscal 2022 and prior years, all Financial Goals had either a “Plan” target, or “Plan” and “Goal” targets. For Fiscal 2022 and prior years, all Financial Goals had a “cliff” payout structure, so that performance below “Plan” level earned nothing, and performance at or above “Plan” yielded full payout. Some executives, typically those with merchant responsibility, could also achieve an additional incremental payout for achieving performance at the “Goal” level (set above “Plan”). Personal Goals, such as controlling URBN expenses to equal or below budget, are normally “cliff” targets.

For Fiscal 2023, the Compensation Committee benchmarked the Company’s Performance Bonuses against its peer group and decided to adjust the structure of its bonuses. For Fiscal 2023, the Compensation Committee set a “Target” percentage of Base Salary for each executive. For each executive other than the CEO, 75% of the Performance Bonus is based on Financial Goals and 25% is based on Personal Goals. The Financial Goals of named executives without merchant responsibilities are based on achieving URBN Net Sales and Operating Income targets. The Financial Goals of Brand CEOs are based on achieving brand Net Sales and Operating Income targets. Unlike past “cliff” targets, the Compensation Committee set Threshold, Target, and Max levels of performance for each Financial Goal. At “Target” level, the executive receives 100% of their Target Financial bonus, at “Threshold” they receive 50% of Target Financial bonus, and at “Max” they receive 200% of Target Financial bonus. For achievement between Threshold and Target, or Target and Max, the payout is linearly interpolated. The Compensation Committee selected five strategic Personal Goals for each executive. Every named executive received a Personal Goal tied to achieving URBN’s Fiscal 2023 Sustainability Goals. Every named executive also received a Personal Goal tied to achieving a stated increase in the Q4 FY2023 Initial Markup for URBN or their brand(s) as applicable.

 

Role of Executive Officers in Determining Performance Factors  

With respect to the performance bonus factors of all named executive officers, the Chief Executive Officer, the Chief Financial Officer, the Chief Operating Officer and the Chief Administrative Officer make recommendations to the Compensation Committee, which it considers when setting the performance bonus plans.

Measuring Achievement: Payment of Bonuses

At the end of the fiscal year, the Compensation Committee determines the extent of achievement of the pre-established performance targets for each criterion. The Compensation Committee has discretion to exclude the positive and/or negative results of material events that it does not believe should affect the calculation of the achievement of performance goals, such as impairment of assets and goodwill, legal judgments and settlements, foreign currency exchange rates, force majeure events, major corporate events such as acquisitions, divestitures and restructuring, material changes in laws and regulations, cost or approved corporate initiatives, and other matters that management may recommend to the Compensation Committee. The level of achievement attained is applied to a schedule to determine the individual’s adjusted performance bonus percentage, which is then multiplied by the individual’s target award. The Compensation Committee has the discretion to award that amount or adjust the award payable if it believes such action would be in the best interest of the Company. While these awards were designed to be deductible under the performance-based compensation

28


 

exception under Section 162(m) of the Code, the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “TCJA”) eliminated the performance-based compensation exception such that all compensation over one million dollars paid to “covered employees” would be nondeductible. The TCJA also modified the definition of “covered employees.” Previously, “covered employees” included the chief executive officer of a corporation as of the close of the taxable year, or the three highest compensated officers for the taxable year (other than the chief executive officer and the chief financial officer). This term was modified under the TCJA to include any employee who was the chief executive officer or the chief financial officer or one of the three highest compensated officers (“Covered Employee”). In addition, an individual will generally be considered a Covered Employee if he or she was a “covered employee” under Section 162(m) (as in effect before the enactment of the TCJA) during any taxable year beginning after 2016.

Set forth in the tables below are the performance targets and the percentage of performance bonus subject to each performance objective for Fiscal 2022 for (i) the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, (ii) the Co-President and Chief Creative Officer, (iii) the Co-President and Chief Operating Officer, (iv) the Chief Financial Officer, and (iv) the Global Chief Executive Officer of Urban Outfitters Group and Free People Group.

As described above, for Fiscal 2022, either a portion or all of each named executive officer’s bonus was tied to one or two incremental levels of Net Sales and Operating Income measures: “Plan” and “Goal.” The Urban Outfitters Brand met its “Plan” for Net Sales of $1.59 billion, its “Goal” for Net Sales of $1.62 billion, its “Plan” for Operating Income of $57.7 million, and its “Goal” for Operating Income of $60.6 million. The Urban Outfitters Brand’s actual Net Sales were $1.68 billion and its actual Operating Income was $141.9 million. As a result, bonuses tied to the Urban Outfitters Brand performance criteria were paid at the “Goal” level.

 

The Anthropologie Brand met its “Plan” for Net Sales of $1.66 billion, its “Goal” for Net Sales of $1.69 billion, its “Plan” for Operating Income of $98.8 million, and its “Goal” for Operating Income of $103.8 million. The Anthropologie Brand’s actual Net Sales were $1.79 billion and its actual Operating Income was $182.0 million. As a result, bonuses tied to the Anthropologie Brand performance criteria were paid at the “Goal” level.

The Free People Brand met its “Plan” for Net Sales of $770 million, its “Goal” for Net Sales of $785.5 million, its “Plan” for Operating Income of $73.3 million, and its “Goal” for Operating Profit of $77 million. The Free People Brand’s actual Net Sales were $1.00 billion and its actual Operating Income was $156.2 million. As a result, bonuses tied to the Free People Brand performance criteria were paid at the “Goal” level.

Richard A. Hayne – Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

 

Bonus Criteria

 

Percent of

Total Bonus

Potential

 

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Urban Outfitters Brand meets or exceeds Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Urban Outfitters Brand meets or exceeds Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Anthropologie Brand meets or exceeds Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Anthropologie Brand meets or exceeds Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Free People Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Free People Brand meets or exceeds Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Free People Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Free People Brand meets or exceeds Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

 

 

 

100.00

%

29


 

 

Francis J. Conforti – Co-President and Chief Operating Officer

 

Bonus Criteria

 

Percent of

Total Bonus

Potential

 

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Free People Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Free People Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Achievement of Individual Initiatives1

 

 

50.00

%

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

(1)

For Fiscal 2022, Mr. Conforti had five individual initiatives:  two relating to economic value added, two relating to expense control and one relating to hiring.

Melanie Marein-Efron – Chief Financial Officer

 

Bonus Criteria

 

Percent of

Total Bonus

Potential

 

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Free People Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Free People Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

8.33

%

Achievement of Individual Initiatives1

 

 

50.00

%

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

(1)

For Fiscal 2022, Ms. Marein-Efron had four individual initiatives:  three relating to economic value added and one relating to expense control.

 

 

Sheila B. Harrington – Global Chief Executive Officer Urban Outfitters Group and Free People Group

 

Bonus Criteria

 

Percent of

Total Bonus

Potential

 

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.50

%

Urban Outfitters Brand meets or exceeds Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

7.00

%

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.50

%

Urban Outfitters Brand meets or exceeds Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

7.00

%

Free People Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.50

%

Free People Brand achieves Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

7.00

%

Free People Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.50

%

Free People Brand achieves Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

7.00

%

Achievement of Individual Initiatives1

 

 

30.00

%

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

(1)

For Fiscal 2022, Ms. Harrington had four individual initiatives:  one relating to economic value added, two relating to sales and one relating to hiring.

 

 

Margaret A. Hayne – Co-President and Chief Creative Officer

 

30


 

 

Bonus Criteria

 

Percent of

Total Bonus

Potential

 

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Urban Outfitters Brand meets or exceeds Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Urban Outfitters Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Urban Outfitters Brand meets or exceeds Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Anthropologie Brand meets or exceeds Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Anthropologie Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Anthropologie Brand meets or exceeds Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Free People Brand achieves Net Sales “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Free People Brand meets or exceeds Net Sales “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

Free People Brand achieves Operating Income “Plan”

 

 

10.00

%

Free People Brand meets or exceeds Operating Income “Goal”

 

 

6.67

%

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

In the future, if the Company were to change the financial budgets or goals upon which the performance targets and awards were based for a particular fiscal year, the Compensation Committee would have discretion to adjust bonus awards accordingly where it believes it is warranted in light of the objectives of the compensation program. With respect to Covered Employees, however, such adjustments may only be made to lower the compensation that would otherwise be receivable.

Equity-Based Incentives

The Compensation Committee believes that stock ownership by management and equity-based performance compensation arrangements are useful tools to align the interests of management with those of the Company’s shareholders. Where executives are shareholders themselves, the executives will realize a direct benefit by maximizing shareholder value. In addition, as shareholders, executives will benefit from successful growth of the Company’s brands to the extent that this will increase the value of their shareholdings. Accordingly, the Company’s executives are eligible to receive stock appreciation rights, performance stock units, restricted stock units, restricted stock and stock options under the Company’s stock incentive plans, which have been approved by the Company’s shareholders. The Company may grant awards under the Urban Outfitters 2017 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2017 Plan”). In addition, there are awards outstanding under the Urban Outfitters 2008 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2008 Plan”) although awards may no longer be made under the 2008 Plan.

The Compensation Committee determines whether to grant equity awards, the type of award and the size of the grant to each executive officer based upon its overall assessment. The Compensation Committee evaluates the executive officer’s performance after taking into consideration prior years’ grants, the organizational impact of the executive officer and the need to respond to competitive conditions in order retain executive officers and attract new candidates.  

Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units

Performance stock unit (“PSU”) awards and restricted stock unit (“RSU”) awards are forms of equity-based incentives available to the Compensation Committee under the 2017 Plan. RSU awards are purely time-vesting awards.

As discussed above, under “—Design of Compensation Program—Long-Term Versus Currently Paid Out Compensation,” the Company believes that the PSU awards made in Fiscal 2022 offer the potential for meaningful compensation for superior performance measured over an extended period of time. Vesting is both time-based and performance-based; the awards will not vest until the date specified in the award agreement and, consistent with our core principle of providing pay for performance, are forfeited if the established performance criteria are not achieved. The Compensation Committee considers the PSU awards granted in Fiscal 2022 to be an integral component of the named executive officers’ overall compensation.

 

In Fiscal 2022, the Company made grants of PSUs and RSUs to named executive officers. On April 12, 2021, the Company granted 65,000 PSUs and 65,000 RSUs to Francis J. Conforti, Co-President and Chief Operating Officer, 25,000 PSUs and RSUs to Margaret A. Hayne, Co-President and Chief Creative Officer, 37,500 PSUs and RSUs to Sheila B. Harrington, Global Chief Executive Officer of the Urban Outfitters and Free People Brands, and 15,000 PSUs and RSUs to Melanie Marien-Efron, Chief Financial Officer of URBN. One-third of the grants are subject to a performance period ending on April 12, 2023 where the average operating profit margin for Urban Outfitters, Inc. for fiscal years 2022 and 2023 is equal to or greater than 2%, one-third of the grants are subject to a

31


 

performance period ending on April 12, 2024 where the average operating profit margin for Urban Outfitters, Inc. for fiscal years 2022, 2023, and 2024 is equal to or greater than 2%, and the remaining one third of the grants are subject to a performance period ending on April 12, 2025 where the average operating profit margin for Urban Outfitters, Inc. for fiscal years 2022, 2023, 2024 and 2025 is equal to or greater than 2%.  

Timing

The Company generally considers once-a-year grants to a broad group of executives and managers, including named executive officers, typically at regularly scheduled board meetings and at such other times as necessary for business purposes related to employee promotion, or retention, or new hires. The Company makes grants that are effective on or after the date when the “Administrator” (defined in the Plans as the Compensation Committee, or, for grants under a specified threshold made to certain employees, a committee of which the Chairman is the sole member) approves the grant. The Company does not time grants with respect to the release of positive or negative material non-public information.

Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plan

The Company maintains an “unfunded” Deferred Compensation Plan primarily for the purpose of providing deferred compensation to a select group of employees who are limited in their participation under the Company’s 401(k) plan. Accordingly, the Deferred Compensation Plan is exempt from Sections 201(2), 301(a)(3) and 401(a)(1) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended, and complies with the requirements of Section 409A of the Code. The terms of the Deferred Compensation Plan were adopted by the Board of Directors on November 27, 2012, and the Deferred Compensation Plan became effective on February 1, 2013.

Deferred compensation under the Deferred Compensation Plan consists of elective deferral credits, if any, made by the participant and discretionary contribution credits made by the Company. Elective deferral credits will be fully vested. Discretionary contribution credits may be subject to a vesting schedule determined by the Company. Payment obligations, if any, under the Deferred Compensation Plan are payable in cash on a date or dates selected by the participant or upon certain specified events such as termination of employment, death or disability, subject to change in certain specified circumstances.

Additional Types of Compensation

In addition to the three main elements, the Company provides compensation to its executive officers in the form of: (i) a 401(k) matching contribution available to all employees who have completed three months of service, which is $0.50 as of January 1, 2019, on every $1.00 of employee deferral up to 6% of salary match, with a vesting schedule of 20% a year for five years, with the deferral limited by applicable law; (ii) a holiday bonus, capped at $5,000; and (iii) employee awards made to all staff with fixed dollar amounts, plus the tax cost of such awards, for terms of service, in five-year service increments, ranging from $1,000 for 10 years of service to $15,000 for 30 years of service.

At its discretion, the Compensation Committee may also award bonuses to employees, including named executive officers, for individual achievement or outstanding performance, to motivate for achievement of specific Company or individual goals and/or to promote retention and loyalty to the Company.

Potential Payments Upon Changes in Control; Certain Corporate Transactions

The 2017 Plan provides that upon a change in control, all remaining unvested options and restricted stock awards will immediately vest and become exercisable, as applicable. The 2017 Plan, however, provides the Compensation Committee with the flexibility to specify the change in control provisions in the award agreement.  In Fiscal 2022, all award agreements granted to key executives were under the 2017 Plan and included a provision that vesting would accelerate upon a change in control of the Company.  “Change in control” was defined to include an event in which any person or group acquires majority beneficial ownership of the Company, other than Richard A. Hayne or benefit plans sponsored by either the Company or its subsidiaries. In deciding whether to exclude the change in control provisions in the grants, the Compensation Committee considers various factors, such as consistency with previous Company plans, industry practice, competition in the marketplace and effects on retention. In Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee directed management to amend the grant instruments for the 2017 Stock Plan to include a “double-trigger” change of control provision. As a result, grants under the 2017 Plan for Fiscal 2023 and beyond will accelerate vesting only if there is a change in control and the employee is terminated without cause or resigns for good reason.

In the event of certain corporate transactions (such as a merger, consolidation, acquisition of property or stock, separation, reorganization or liquidation), the Compensation Committee has discretion to terminate all or a portion of outstanding options and stock appreciation rights, effective as of the closing of the corporate transaction, if it determines that such termination is in the best interests of the Company. If the Compensation Committee decides to terminate, the holder will have the right to exercise outstanding options and stock appreciation rights on at least seven days’ notice. The Compensation Committee selected these corporate transactions as a triggering event for potential termination because they believe they are customary in industry practice.

32


 

Benchmarking

In January 2021, Korn Ferry, the Company’s compensation consultant, reviewed publicly available information regarding the compensation paid to named executive officers of specialty retailers similar in operations and revenue to the Company and made a presentation to the Compensation Committee regarding this analysis. The retailers reviewed were PVH Corp, Ralph Lauren Corp, Williams-Sonoma, Under Armour, Capri Holdings (Michael Kors), Tapestry, American Eagle Outfitters, Tailored Brands, Abercrombie & Fitch, Carter’s, Fossil Group, Genesco, Chicos FAS, Columbia Sportswear, G-III Apparel Group, Lululemon Athletica, Express and Guess.  The Compensation Committee reviewed the figures provided by the consultant, which provided the group’s median and the 25th and 75th percentiles for informational and overall comparison purposes. The Compensation Committee also directed management to prepare benchmarking information from the publicly filed information of the Peer Group companies for the Compensation Committee’s use and review. Although the Compensation Committee considered the comparative data provided, there is no target percentile or precise position in which the Compensation Committee aims to set compensation other than to generally be competitive in the marketplace.  

With respect to executives other than the named executive officers, neither Korn Ferry nor the Compensation Committee has undertaken any formal benchmarking over the last three fiscal years; however, in prior years of reviewing base salaries to determine whether the Company is meeting its goal of providing competitive compensation that will attract and retain outstanding personnel, the Compensation Committee from time to time has reviewed publicly available compensation information described in the periodic filings of an informal group of other publicly traded companies in the specialty retail industry, typically including the retailers reviewed by the Company’s compensation consultant, for purposes of a market reference.

If the Compensation Committee elects to analyze comparative data, there may be a variation in the companies reviewed for comparative purposes from year-to-year depending on what information becomes most relevant to the Compensation Committee, although the Compensation Committee anticipates referring to information available for publicly traded specialty retailers, including those reviewed in 2021, for the foreseeable future.

The Compensation Committee takes the Company’s own historical data into consideration to ensure that compensation increases are consistent with the growth in operating profit and in responsibility of its executives. Each year, the Compensation Committee reviews a summary of all of the Company’s named executive officer and key management personnel compensation for the previous fiscal year as well as prior fiscal years. All historical data is viewed with the operating results and responsibilities of management personnel and their specific performance.

Compensation Committee Discretion

The factors related to increasing the compensation and potential compensation from bonuses of named executive officers from year-to-year take into account increased revenue and profitability, performance and measurably increased responsibilities, with a focus on both performance and the leveraging of selling, general and administrative expenses. The Company has not generally decreased base salaries or the bonus potential of named executive officers. This is because its history of growth has led to larger responsibilities for its named executive officers and because as a matter of philosophy, it does not generally reduce these compensation elements for existing employees. As more fully described above, however, at Richard A. Hayne’s request, the Compensation Committee set his base salary at $1.00 in Fiscal 2009, which has remained in effect since that time and continued in effect for Fiscal 2021.

Under the Incentive Plan, the Compensation Committee has discretion in the granting of performance bonus awards and can grant such awards to executive officers who are not Covered Employees at its discretion, even if specified performance goals are not achieved. In future fiscal years, the requirements for performance bonus awards could be waived to reward specific performance achievements in an instance where the actual criteria for a performance bonus were not met or for purposes of retention. The Compensation Committee may reduce any executive officer’s award if it believes such action would be in the best interest of the Company. At the end of a fiscal year, the Compensation Committee also has the ability to grant cash bonuses to any executive officer on a discretionary basis, as described above in “—Additional Types of Compensation.”

Pursuant to the Plans, the Compensation Committee has discretion to accelerate the date on which options or stock appreciation rights may be exercised and may accelerate the date of termination of the restrictions applicable to restricted stock and restricted stock units if it determines that to do either would be in the best interests of the Company and the plan participants.

The Company at present has no employment agreements or contracts with its currently serving named executive officers and has no policies for post-termination compensation arrangements. In the future, the Company may, in its sole discretion, decide to provide some form of severance to other named executive officers in the event that any named executive officer’s employment ceases.

Tax and Accounting Considerations

The applicability of Section 162(m) of the Code may affect the tax deductibility of certain portions of named executive officers’ compensation. As discussed above, the TCJA eliminated the exception under Section 162(m) of the Code for performance-based

33


 

compensation and commissions, such that all compensation over one million dollars would be nondeductible. Where possible, the Company will structure compensation for its executive officers in a way that preserves tax deductibility under Section 162(m).

The Company does not usually consider the tax consequences to named executive officers of cash compensation or of equity-based compensation, though it considers the tax treatment to the Company for non-qualified options and the non-qualifying disposition of qualified options to be favorable.

Security Ownership Guidelines

In Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee recommended, and the Board of Directors adopted Stock Holding Requirements. Under this policy, non-employee directors, the CEO, and other executive officers are required to hold the lesser of a specified number of Common Shares or “URBN Equity” with an aggregate value equal to a specified multiple of their annual cash compensation or base salaries. Individuals covered by the policy have five years from the date they become covered by the policy to comply. After the five-year period, individuals who are not compliant must hold at least 50% of the net, after-tax Common Shares acquired under the Company’s stock plan and may not sell certain other owned Common Shares.

In addition, the Code of Conduct prohibits the directors and executive officers of the Company, other Company employees who have been granted options to purchase Company securities or who have received awards of equity-based securities, all Company employees who report directly to the Chief Executive Officer, and all employees in the Company’s Finance Department at the director level or above from trading any options on Company securities, maintaining a short position in Company securities, or engaging in certain hedging or monetization transactions, including through the use of financial instruments such as prepaid variable forward contracts, equity swaps, or zero cost collars related to the Company’s Common Shares.

 

Consideration of Advisory Shareholder Vote on Executive Compensation

At the 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, our shareholders approved, on a non-binding advisory basis, the compensation of the Company’s named executive officers, including the Company’s compensation practices and principles and their implementation, as discussed and disclosed in the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, the compensation tables, and the narrative executive compensation disclosure contained in our 2021 Proxy Statement. The Compensation Committee appreciates and values the views of our shareholders.

As the Compensation Committee evaluated the Company’s compensation practices throughout Fiscal 2022, the Compensation Committee was mindful of the strong support our shareholders expressed by the 2021 shareholder advisory vote. As discussed above, based on its benchmarking, the Compensation Committee chose to make certain changes to the Company’s pay practices, including adoption of a Stock Holding Requirement, establishment of a double-trigger change of control policy, and revision of the structure of the Company’s Performance Bonus plans for Fiscal Year 2023 and beyond.

Future advisory votes on executive compensation, including the advisory vote that will be held at the Annual Meeting, will serve as an additional tool to assist the Board of Directors and the Compensation Committee in evaluating the alignment of the Company’s executive compensation program with the interests of the Company and its shareholders.

At the 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, our shareholders expressed a preference that advisory votes on executive compensation occur every three years. The Company received proxies representing approximately 500,000 shares after the deadline for voting by proxy, however, which were not included in the results of the 2017 vote. Had those proxies been timely submitted, the recommendation of the Company’s shareholders would have been that the Company hold future advisory votes to approve executive compensation every year. After taking this into consideration, the Board of Directors determined that it is in the best interest of the Company and its shareholders to hold an advisory vote to approve executive compensation annually until the next required shareholder vote on the frequency of future advisory votes to approve executive compensation, which is scheduled to occur at the 2023 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.  

34


 

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE REPORT

The following report is not deemed to be “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC or subject to the SEC’s proxy rules or the liabilities of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and the report shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any prior or subsequent filing by the Company under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act.

The Compensation and Leadership Development Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors (the “Committee”) has submitted the following report for inclusion in this Proxy Statement:

Our Committee has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis contained in this Proxy Statement with management. Based on our Committee’s review of and the discussions with management with respect to the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, our Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in this Proxy Statement and in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022 for filing with the SEC.

The foregoing report is provided by the following directors, who constitute the Committee:

Todd R. Morgenfeld, Chairman of the Compensation and Leadership Development Committee

Elizabeth Ann Lambert

Amin N. Maredia

Wesley S. McDonald

 

 

 

35


 

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

Name and Principal Position

 

Fiscal

Year

 

Salary

($)

 

 

Bonus

($)

 

 

Stock

Awards

($)

 

 

 

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan

Compensation

($)

 

 

 

All Other

Compensation(1)

($)

 

 

 

Total

($)

 

Richard A. Hayne

 

2022

 

 

1

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000,000

 

 

 

 

35,538

 

(2)

 

 

1,040,539

 

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

 

2021

 

 

1

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31,286

 

 

 

 

36,287

 

Urban Outfitters, Inc.

 

2020

 

 

1

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42,823

 

 

 

 

47,824

 

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melanie Marein-Efron

 

2022

 

 

539,481

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

1,144,500

 

(3)(4)

 

 

528,525

 

 

 

 

8,631

 

(5)

 

 

2,226,137

 

Chief Financial Officer

 

2021

 

 

385,500

 

 

 

110,000

 

 

 

271,320

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8,386

 

 

 

 

775,206

 

Urban Outfitters, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Principal Financial Officer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Francis J. Conforti

 

2022

 

 

903,461

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

4,959,500

 

(6)(7)

 

 

1,350,000

 

 

 

 

8,788

 

(8)

 

 

7,226,749

 

Co-President & Chief Operating Officer

 

2021

 

 

728,741

 

 

 

275,000

 

 

 

1,033,600

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8,455

 

 

 

 

2,045,796

 

Urban Outfitters, Inc.

 

2020

 

 

734,279

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

1,207,600

 

 

 

 

349,838

 

 

 

 

8,504

 

 

 

 

2,305,221

 

Sheila B. Harrington

 

2022

 

 

1,003,846

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

2,861,250

 

(9)(10)

 

 

2,000,000

 

 

 

 

6,328

 

(11)

 

 

5,876,424

 

Global Chief Executive Officer

 

2021

 

 

675,108

 

 

 

405,000

 

 

 

1,292,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,015

 

 

 

 

2,378,122

 

Urban Outfitters Group & Free People Group

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Margaret A. Hayne

 

2022

 

 

903,461

 

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

1,907,500

 

(12)(13)

 

 

1,350,000

 

 

 

 

9,071

 

(14)

 

 

4,175,032

 

Co-President & Chief Creative Officer

 

2021

 

 

654,726

 

 

 

275,000

 

 

 

775,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8,905

 

 

 

 

1,713,831

 

Urban Outfitters, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1)

Includes matching cash contributions in Fiscal 2022 by the Company under the Urban Outfitters 401(k) Savings Plan of $150 for Mr. Richard A. Hayne, $8,499 for Ms. Marein-Efron, $8,700 for Mr. Conforti, $6,240 for Ms. Harrington and $8,700 for Ms. Hayne.

 

(2)

Includes automobile insurance premiums in the amount of $5,576 and life insurance premiums in the amount of $29,812 paid by the Company for Mr. Richard A. Hayne.

 

(3)

Stock award represents 15,000 performance-based restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021, and subject to a performance period ending on January 31, 2025. The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $572,250. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for performance-based restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(4)

Stock award represents 15,000 restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021. The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $572,250. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(5)

Includes life insurance premiums paid by the Company for Ms. Marein-Efron in the amount of $132.

 

(6)

Stock award represents 65,000 performance-based restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021, and subject to a performance period ending on January 31, 2025. The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $2,479,750. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for performance-based restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(7)

Stock award represents 65,000 restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021.  The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $2,479,750. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(8)

Includes life insurance premiums paid by the Company for Mr. Conforti in the amount of $88.

 

(9)

Stock award represents 37,500 performance-based restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021, and subject to a performance period ending on January 31, 2025. The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $1,430,625. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for performance-based restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(10)

Stock award represents 37,500 restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021.  The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $1,430,625. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(11)

Includes life insurance premiums paid by the Company for Ms. Harrington in the amount of $88.

36


 

 

 

(12)

Stock award represents 25,000 performance-based restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021, and subject to a performance period ending on January 31, 2025. The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $953,750. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for performance-based restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(13)

Stock award represents 25,000 restricted stock units granted pursuant to an award made on April 12, 2021.  The Aggregate Fair Value for the award was $953,750. For a discussion of the assumptions and accounting for restricted stock units, please see note 10 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2022, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, as filed with the SEC on April 1, 2022. For a description of the conditions of these awards, see “—Compensation Discussion and Analysis—Equity-Based Incentives—Performance Stock Units and Restricted Stock Units.”

 

(14)

Includes life insurance premiums paid by the Company for Ms. Hayne in the amount of $371.

 

 

37


 

 

 

FISCAL 2022 GRANTS OF PLAN-BASED AWARDS

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Future Payouts

Under

Non-Equity Incentive Plan

Awards(1)

 

 

Estimated Future Payouts

Under Equity Incentive Plan

Awards

 

 

All Other

Stock

Awards:

Number

of Shares

of Stock

 

All Other

Option

Awards:

Number of

Securities

Underlying

 

Exercise

or Base

Price of

Option

 

Grant Date

Fair Value

of Stock

and Option

 

 

Name

 

Grant

Date

 

Threshold

($)

 

 

Target

($)

 

 

Maximum

($)

 

 

Threshold

(#)

 

 

Target

(#)

 

 

Maximum

(#)

 

 

or Units

(#)

 

Options

(#)

 

Awards

($/Sh)

 

Awards

($)

 

 

Richard A. Hayne

 

 

 

 

600,000

 

 

 

600,000

 

 

 

1,000,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melanie Marein-Efron

 

 

 

 

528,525

 

 

 

528,525

 

 

 

528,525

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04/12/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

572,250

 

(2)

 

 

04/12/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

572,250

 

(3)

Francis J. Conforti

 

 

 

 

1,350,000

 

 

 

1,350,000

 

 

 

1,350,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04/12/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

65,000

 

 

 

65,000

 

 

 

65,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,479,750

 

(4)

 

 

04/12/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

65,000

 

 

 

65,000

 

 

 

65,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,479,750

 

(5)

Sheila B. Harrington

 

 

 

 

1,440,000

 

 

 

1,440,000

 

 

 

2,000,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04/12/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37,500

 

 

 

37,500

 

 

 

37,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,430,625

 

(6)

 

 

04/12/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37,500

 

 

 

37,500

 

 

 

37,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,430,625

 

(7)

Margaret A. Hayne

 

 

 

 

810,000

 

 

 

810,000

 

 

 

1,350,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

04/12/2021